voyager season 1 episode 3

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voyager season 1 episode 3

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voyager season 1 episode 3

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voyager season 1 episode 3

VOY Season 1

  • View history
  • 3 Background information
  • 4.1 Starring
  • 4.2 Also starring
  • 4.3 Guest and co-stars
  • 4.5.1 Production companies
  • 5 Media releases
  • 6 External links

Episodes [ ]

Summary [ ].

Captain Kathryn Janeway 's chief of security, Lieutenant Tuvok , has disappeared while involved in a counter-espionage mission aboard a Maquis ship, whose last known position was somewhere in the Badlands . While en route to investigate Tuvok's disappearance, the maiden voyage of the Federation starship USS Voyager ends in disaster as the ship and her crew are pulled seventy thousand light years into the far reaches of the Delta Quadrant . After locating the missing Maquis ship nearby, and learning of the enormity of their predicament, the crew ascertains that an extra-galactic entity called the Caretaker is responsible for pulling them across the galaxy in an attempt to find a compatible species to mate with. The Caretaker confides in Janeway that he is dying and requires a mate to continue caring for a species who live nearby known as the Ocampa . After witnessing the death of the Caretaker, Janeway makes the decision to destroy his technology to prevent it falling into the hands of a local malevolent species known as the Kazon . The firefight which ensues results in both the destruction of the Caretaker's "array" and the renegade Maquis ship; in an act of self-sacrifice, the only way for Voyager 's crew to return to the Alpha Quadrant is lost.

After incorporating the Maquis crew, as well as a Talaxian , Neelix , and an Ocampa , Kes , Voyager sets a course for home.

Initial tension and mistrust between the opposing Starfleet and Maquis crews is explored in " Parallax ", " Prime Factors ", and " Learning Curve ". The consequences of isolation and loss on the crew begin to develop in " The Cloud " and " Eye of the Needle ", and the crew are also teased with the possibility of returning home several times throughout the first season, only to have it cruelly snatched away. The Kazon reappear and prove to be a powerful nemesis, while in " Phage " an additional threat is introduced, in the disease ravaging organ-harvesting Vidiians . Crucially, Janeway's decision to maintain Voyager as a Starfleet vessel is brought sharply into focus when a member of the former Maquis crew, Ensign Seska , is revealed to be a Cardassian spy, and in a showdown with Janeway, defects to the Kazon.

Each of the primary cast members gets a chance to develop their characters in the first season. Chakotay 's heritage and relationship with Janeway are highlighted in " Parallax ", " The Cloud ", " State of Flux ", and " Cathexis ". B'Elanna Torres becomes the ship's new Chief Engineer in " Parallax ", reveals more of her Klingon character in " Faces ", and begins to adjust to Starfleet's code of conduct in " Prime Factors ". Lieutenant Tom Paris is falsely accused of murder in " Ex Post Facto ", Ensign Harry Kim experiences death in " Emanations ", while Lieutenant Tuvok learns to adapt in " Learning Curve ". Neelix loses a lung in " Phage " and faces up to the loss of his family, and his species' virtual genocide in " Jetrel ". Kes' mental abilities begin to assert themselves in " Time and Again " and " Cathexis ", and The Doctor (EMH) slowly begins to experience new emotions, and gain new rights, privileges, and responsibilities in " Eye of the Needle " and " Heroes and Demons ".

Background information [ ]

  • This season was broadcast concurrently with Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Season 3 .
  • Four VOY Season 2 episodes – " Projections ", " Elogium ", " Twisted ", and " The 37's " – were filmed as part of Season 1, but were held over to air during the second season. In the UK, these four episodes were originally screened and released on video as part of Season 1.
  • Filming on this season wrapped on 12 May 1995 . ( Star Trek Monthly  issue 5 , p. 10)
  • In its final form, the season is comprised of one episode (" Caretaker ") consisting of a teaser and eight acts, six episodes (" Parallax "–" Ex Post Facto ") that each include a teaser and four acts, and eight episodes (" Emanations "–" Learning Curve ") that each have a teaser and five acts. Although all the regular episodes of the series were originally intended to each have a teaser and five acts, Rick Berman announced – on Monday, 5 December, 1994 – that the regular episodes would be changing to a four-act format. This decision was reversed in the first week of January 1995, with additional air time for commercials apparently being the reason. ( A Vision of the Future - Star Trek: Voyager )
  • Characters which ' crossover ' from Star Trek: Deep Space Nine are Evek , Quark and Morn (" Caretaker ").
  • One plot concept began development in this season and was intended to be included in the season, but was kept back so that the episode " Jetrel " could be produced instead. The story idea was later used as the basis for the third season installment " Fair Trade ".

Credits [ ]

Based Upon Star Trek created by Gene Roddenberry

Starring [ ]

  • Kate Mulgrew as Captain Kathryn Janeway

Also starring [ ]

  • Robert Beltran as Commander Chakotay
  • Roxann Biggs-Dawson as Lieutenant B'Elanna Torres
  • Jennifer Lien as Kes
  • Robert Duncan McNeill as Lieutenant Tom Paris
  • Ethan Phillips as Neelix
  • Robert Picardo as The Doctor
  • Tim Russ as Lieutenant Tuvok
  • Garrett Wang as Ensign Harry Kim

Guest and co-stars [ ]

  • VOY Season 1 performers

Uncredited [ ]

  • Patric J. Abaravich – Camera Electrician ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Greg Agalsoff – 2nd Unit Sound Mixer ("Caretaker"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Cathexis")
  • John Agalsoff – Mike Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/Sound Mixer ("Time and Again", "The Cloud")/2nd Unit Sound Playback Operator ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • M. Anderson – Playback Machine Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Fred Apolito – Propmaker ("Caretaker")
  • Karen Asano-Myers – Hair Stylist ("Time and Again", "The Cloud", Ex Post Facto", "Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", "Faces", "Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Hair Stylist ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Jane Aull – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Michael Backauskas – Cover Visual Effects Supervisor ("Caretaker")
  • Bales – 2nd Unit Extra Grip ("Time and Again"–"The Cloud")
  • Philip Barberio – Visual Effects Coordinator ("Caretaker")
  • Marilyn Basaker – Costume First Hand ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Kathleen Barrett – DGA Trainee ("Caretaker"–"Time and Again")
  • Jeffrey Baxter – Special Effects Artist/Digital Compositor ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Richard J. Beban – Extra Camera Assistant ("Emanations", "Jetrel")
  • Pamela Berggren – Key Costumer ("Caretaker", "Emanations"–"Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", "Jetrel")/2nd Unit Costumer ("Caretaker", "Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • David Bernard – Sound Cable Person ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Bernstien – 2nd Unit Lamp Operator/Electrician ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Ben Betts – Video Operator ("Parallax"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Video Playback Operator ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Cathexis", "Learning Curve")
  • Billy Blackman – Gang Boss ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Dustin Blauvelt – Extra Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Rob Bloch – Animal Trainer/Wrangler: Critters of the Cinema ("Caretaker", "The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto")
  • T. Blue – 2nd Unit Mike Operator/Blue Box ("Faces")
  • Robert Bonchune – Visual Effects Artist: Miniatures – WonderWorks, Inc. ("Caretaker")
  • Cathy Bond – Additional Second Assistant Director ("Caretaker")
  • Jason Bond – Color Compositor ("Emanations")
  • Boris – Greensperson ("Caretaker", "Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", listed as "Goris" on the latter two)
  • Grant Boucher – CGI Supervisor: Amblin Imaging ("Emanations")
  • Roger Bourse – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Emanations", "State of Flux")
  • Janice D. Brandow – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Richard Briere – 2nd Unit Extra Grip ("Caretaker")
  • M. Brown – Extra First Assistant Camera ("Caretaker")
  • Belinda Bryant – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker"–"Phage", "Heroes and Demons", "Faces", "Learning Curve")
  • Randy Burgess – 2nd Grip ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Key Grip ("Time and Again"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Learning Curve")
  • Burton – Second Assistant Camera Operator ("Prime Factors")
  • Christian H. Burton – Second Assistant Visual Effects Camera Operator ("Parallax")
  • Sal Butera – Pool Technical Adviser ("The Cloud", "Jetrel"–"Learning Curve")
  • Byers – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • John Calvin Byrd – Promotions Coordinator ("Learning Curve")
  • Ron Calvaruzo – Grip ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • Carlucci – Special Effects Labor Artist ("Caretaker"–"Prime Factors")
  • John Carroll – On-Line Editor
  • Adolfo Castanon – Greensman ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Violet Cazanjian – Additional Second Assistant Director ("State of Flux"–"Heroes and Demons", "Learning Curve")/Second Assistant Director ("Emanations")
  • Vartan Chakarian – Craft Service ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Craft Service ("Caretaker", "Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle", "Learning Curve")
  • Chambers – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Joe Chess – 2nd Unit Director of Photography ("Time and Again–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Jetrel")
  • Ian Christenberry – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Richard Chronister – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Special Effects Artist ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Clairmont – Power Pod Technician ("Caretaker")
  • Clark – Swing Gang ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • Caryl Codon – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker", also listed as Caryl Codon-Tharp )
  • Richmond G. Cogswell – Video Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Lisa Collins – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • George Colucci – Stunt Safety ("Caretaker", "The Cloud")
  • Armando Contreras – Grip/Key Grip ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Crab Dolly Grip ("Caretaker"–"Parallax", "State of Flux"–"Cathexis")
  • Cooley – Electrician ("Parallax")
  • Brian Cooper – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker", "Phage"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Caretaker")
  • Cynthia Coulter – Animal Trainer: Critters of the Cinema ("Ex Post Facto")
  • Cremin – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Ruth Ann Crudup – Studio Teacher ("Time and Again")
  • Dan Curry – Cover Visual Effects Supervisor ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Director ("Caretaker"–"Time and Again")/2nd Unit Visual Effects Producer ("Caretaker", "Phage"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Faces")
  • Joshua Cushner – Motion Control Camera Operator: Image G ("Caretaker")
  • Dick D'Angelo – Swing Gang ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • D'Aquino – Grip ("Caretaker")
  • Jim Davidson – Additional Miniatures ("Caretaker")
  • Davis – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Andrea F. Davis – Propmaker ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Robert De La Garza – Swing Gang ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Michael DeMeritt – Second Assistant Director ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Second Assistant Director ("Parallax"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Learning Curve")
  • Rebecca De Morrio – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Jay Devlin – Grip/Rigging Grip/Extra Grip ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • David Dittmar – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Jon Djanrelian – Craft Service ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Daren Dochterman – Production Illustrator ("Caretaker")
  • Chris Doyle – Stunt Safety ("Caretaker")
  • Doug Drexler – Production Illustrator/Scenic Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Durling – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Hank Edds – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • David Emmerichs – Steadicam Operator ("Caretaker", "The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto")
  • English – Body Makeup Artist ("Eye of the Needle")
  • Estes – Video Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Lennie Evans – Extra Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Robert Eyslee – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Caretaker", "Phage"–"Ex Post Facto", "Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Ted Fay – 2D Animation Supervisor ("Caretaker")
  • Feld – Still Photographer ("Prime Factors")
  • Alfred T. Ferrante – ADR Mixer ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • L. Fife – Studio Teacher ("Time and Again", "Learning Curve")
  • Sue Forrest-Chambers – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Fox – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Fox – 2nd Unit Lamp Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Edward French – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Eye of the Needle")
  • Dino Ganziano – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • James A. Garrett – Assistant Editor ("Parallax", "The Cloud", "Emanations", "Heroes and Demons")
  • B. Gary – 2nd Unit Script Supervisor ("Caretaker", "Time and Again"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Cathexis")/Script Supervisor ("Ex Post Facto")
  • Rusty Geller – Extra Camera Operator ("Emanations", "Jetrel")
  • George – Extra Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Jeff Gersh – Sound Editor ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • John E. Glassco – Medical Adviser ("Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux")
  • Graf – 2nd Unit Lamp Operator/Electrician ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Don Greenberg – Visual Effects Compositing Editor: Digital Magic ("Caretaker")/Visual Effects Compositor ("Parallax", "Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux", "Cathexis", "Jetrel")
  • J. Griffin – 2nd Unit First Assistant Director ("Caretaker")
  • John Gross – Computer Graphics Supervisor: Amblin Imaging ("Caretaker", "Phage")
  • John Grower – Effects and Animation Supervisor: Main Title: Santa Barbara Studios ("Caretaker")
  • Eric Guaglione – Main Title Animation Supervisor: Santa Barbara Studios ("Caretaker")/Animation Supervisor: SBS ("The Cloud")
  • John Guiterrez – Electrician ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Lamp Operator/Electrician ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Dennis Hammermeister – Sound Engineer ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Mike Operator ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Hammond – Electrician ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Kamp Operator/Electrician ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Michael Haney – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Phage")/2nd Unit Makeup Artist ("Time and Again"–"Phage")
  • Peter Hapke – Extra Camera Operator ("Faces")/Camera Operator ("Learning Curve")
  • Harkin – Extra Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Stan Harrison – Cogswell Video Operator ("Faces"–"Jetrel")
  • Hartley – Crab Dolly Grip ("Caretaker")
  • June Haymore – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Heather – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Jaime Heintz – Grip ("Caretaker", also listed as "Heinz" and "Hinds")
  • David E. Hengstellar – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Herrera – Set Security ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Rick Hester – Special Effects Labor Artist ("Prime Factors"–"Learning Curve")
  • Ron High – Extra Camera Operator ("Time and Again"–"The Cloud", "Prime Factors", "Cathexis")/Camera Operator ("Ex Post Facto")
  • Matt Hoffman – Set Costumer ("Parallax", "Phage", "Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux", "Cathexis", "Jetrel")
  • Tina Hoffman – Makeup Artist ("Phage", "Emanations", "Cathexis"–"Faces")
  • Robert Hollocks – International Marketing ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Adam Howard – Visual Effects Animator: Digital Magic ("Caretaker")
  • William Howard – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • J. Hughs – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Darrell Huntsman – Greensperson ("Time and Again")
  • Nancy J. Hvasta – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Cathexis"–"Jetrel")
  • D. Isaac – Sideline Musician ("Prime Factors")
  • D. Jackson – Teleprompter Operator: Q-TV Paramount Promo 2nd Unit ("The Cloud")
  • M. Jennings – 2nd Unit Playback Machine Operator ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Mike Operator ("Parallax")/2nd Unit Sound Cable Person ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")/Boom Operator ("The Cloud")
  • David Jones – CGI Animator: Amblin Imaging ("Emanations")
  • Ian Jones – Grip/Memory Head: Digital Filmworks ("Caretaker")
  • Tammy Kalka – First Aid ("Caretaker")
  • Karnes – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • Ted Katzoff – Sword Technical Adviser ("Heroes and Demons")
  • Virginia Kearns – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Brian Q. Kelley – Electronical Editorial – Video Segments ("Heroes and Demons")
  • Nina Kent – Makeup Artist ("Emanations")
  • Michael Key – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "State of Flux", "Faces"–"Jetrel")
  • Janie Kleiman – Production Executive ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")/2nd Unit Unit Production Manager ("Caretaker", "Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")/2nd Unit Assistant Unit Production Manager ("The Cloud"–"Emanations", "State of Flux")/Assistant Unit Production Manager ("Prime Factors"–"Learning Curve")
  • Douglas Knapp – Camera Operator ("The Cloud", "Emanations")/Extra Camera Operator ("State of Flux")
  • Spencer Knapp – Digital Effects Artist: Digital Magic ("Heroes and Demons")
  • Barry R. Koper – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "State of Flux", "Faces", "Learning Curve")
  • Kevin Koster – DGA Trainee ("Learning Curve")
  • Andrzej Kozlowski – Production Assistant ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Nina Kraft – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons")
  • Kruger – 2nd Unit Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Kruger – Makeup Artist ("Prime Factors")
  • Steve Kruzlock – 2nd Unit Second Grip/2nd Unit Crab Dolly Grip ("Caretaker"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Yvonne Kubis – Key Costumer ("Caretaker")
  • Joe Kudlack – Grip ("Caretaker", also listed as "Kudach" and "Kudlach")
  • Carol Kunz – Costumer Foreperson ("Parallax", "Phage", "Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux", "Cathexis", "Jetrel")
  • Erwin H. Kupitz – Wig Designer ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Rick Lamb – Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker", "Ex Post Facto")
  • Steve LaPorte – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Lasher – First Aid ("Caretaker")
  • Daryl Lathrop – ADR Recordist ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Lavine – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • John Leamer – Casting Associate ("Caretaker")
  • Leavitt – Costumer ("Caretaker", "Time and Again")
  • Stephen Lebed – Motion Control Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Don Lee – Digital Colorist/Compositor: CIS Hollywood ("Caretaker")
  • Jessica W. Leung – DGA Trainee ("Emanations"–"Learning Curve")
  • Audrey Levy – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Lippman – Body Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Prime Factors")
  • Stephanie Lipsky – Key Costumer ("Caretaker", "Time and Again")
  • David Livingston – Cover Director ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Director ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Logan – Grip ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Extra Grip ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Lombardi – Costumer ("Prime Factors")
  • Lott – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • J. Lowe – Location Manager ("Caretaker")
  • Lucas – Grip ("Caretaker")
  • Norman Ludwin – Musician: Bass ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • F. Macchia – Sideline Musician ("Prime Factors")
  • C. Mack – Choreographer ("Caretaker")
  • Chuck Madalone – Stunt Safety ("Caretaker")
  • John Maffe – Executive in Charge: Q-TV Paramount Promos ("The Cloud")
  • John Maldonado – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Emanations")
  • Malinovik – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Larry Markart – 2nd Unit Video Playback ("Jetrel")
  • Mather – 2nd Unit Lamp Operator ("Caretaker")/Lamp Operator ("State of Flux")
  • Michael L. Mayer – Art Director: Re-shoots ("Caretaker")/2nd Unit Art Director ("Time and Again"–"Emanations")
  • Mayhew – 2nd Unit Second Grip ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Tania McComas – Makeup Artist ("Emanations")
  • Shawn McKay – Hair Stylist ("Parallax", "Phage", "Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux", "Cathexis", "Jetrel")
  • Scott McKnight – Assistant Chief Lighting Technician ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Chief Lighting Technician ("Caretaker"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Learning Curve")/Lamp Operator: Re-shoots ("Caretaker")
  • Michael Meinardus – Extra Camera Operator: Steadicam ("Heroes and Demons"–"Cathexis")
  • Richard Craig Meinardus – Extra Camera Operator: Steadicam ("Heroes and Demons"–"Cathexis")
  • Meyer-Arnold – Dialect Coach ("Learning Curve")
  • Ed Miarecki – Propmaker ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • S. Middleton – Extra Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker", "Time and Again"–"Phage", "Ex Post Facto", "Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Second Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker", "Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")/Second Assistant Camera Operator ("Time and Again"–"Phage", "Ex Post Facto"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Heroes and Demons", "Faces"–"Jetrel")
  • Middleton – 2nd Unit Extra Grip ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Glen David Miller – Digital Artist ("Caretaker")
  • P. Miller – 2nd Unit Cable Person/Blue Box ("Jetrel"–"Learning Curve")
  • Andrew Millstein – Motion Control Camera Operator: Image G ("Caretaker")
  • Minsky – Extra First Assistant Camera Operator "B" ("Caretaker")
  • Barbara Minster – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Susie Money – Key Costumer ("Caretaker")
  • Michael Moore – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker", "Phage")
  • Michael Moore – Propmaker ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Tom Moore – Grip ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Grip ("Eye of the Needle"–Emanations", "Learning Curve")
  • Robert Morey – Extra Camera Assistant ("Time and Again"–"Phage")
  • Moseley – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Gil Mosko – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker"–"Phage", "Eye of the Needle"–"Learning Curve")
  • Murphy – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Bill Myer – Makeup Artist ("Faces")
  • Greg Nelson – Makeup Artist ("The Cloud", "Prime Factors")
  • Janet Nemecek – Assistant Script Supervisor
  • John Nesterowicz – Set Assistant Property Person ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Property Person ("State of Flux"–"Cathexis")
  • A. Novis – Sideline Musician:Banjo ("Caretaker")
  • Frank O'Hea – Painter ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Oliver – Sideline Consultant ("Caretaker")
  • Rose Ordile – Animal Wrangler: Criiters of the Cinema ("Caretaker")
  • Orr – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Barbara Pace – Location Contact ("Caretaker")
  • Maurice Palinski – Costumer ("Caretaker", "Heroes and Demons")
  • John Palmer – Special Effects Project Supervisor: WonderWorks ("Caretaker")
  • John Parenteau – Computer Animator: Amblin Imaging ("Caretaker")
  • Peirano – Greensperson ("Caretaker")
  • Brian Penikas – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Lowell Peterson – 2nd Unit Director of Photography ("Learning Curve")
  • Janna Phillips – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Phillips – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Catherine Pittman – Animal Wrangler: Critters of the Cinema ("Caretaker")
  • Domi Piturro – Supervisor 3D Modeling and Scanning ("Caretaker")
  • Dwayne Platz – Grip ("Caretaker")
  • Gloria Ponce – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Brick Price – Visual Effects: Miniatures: WonderWorks ("Caretaker")
  • Price – Film Loader ("State of Flux")
  • David Quashnick – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Faces")
  • Elizabeth Rabe – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Scott Rader – Visual Effects Compositing Editor: Digital Magic ("Caretaker")
  • Maricella Ramirez – First Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Randsdell – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • J. Rathbun – 2nd Unit Property Person ("Caretaker"–"Emanations", "State of Flux", "Jetrel"–"Learning Curve")
  • Craig Reardon – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Katherine Rees – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Mark Reilly – Electrician/Film Loader ("Caretaker")/Second Extra Camera Assistant ("Cathexis", "Learning Curve")
  • Renich – Swing Gang ("Caretaker"–"Heroes and Demons")
  • Riley – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Michael Risner – DGA Trainee: Re-shoots ("Caretaker")/DGA Trainee ("Time and Again"–"Prime Factors")
  • Robbie Robinson – Still Photographer ("Caretaker", "Phage"–"The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto"–"Learning Curve")
  • Jill Rockow – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Emanations")
  • Romero – Makeup Artist ("Heroes and Demons")
  • Joshua D. Rose – Computer Animator ("Caretaker")
  • Julia Rose – Production staff ("Caretaker")
  • Karen Rose – Production staff ("Caretaker")
  • Wally Rose – Stunt Safety ("Caretaker")
  • Rosenberg – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Charlie Russo – Assistant Property Master/Set Property Person ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Barry Safley – Digital Effects Artist: VisionArt ("Caretaker")
  • George Santo Pietro – Dolly Grip ("Parallax"–"Learning Curve")
  • Stewart Satterfield – Transportation Captain ("Parallax"–"Learning Curve")
  • Chris B. Schnitzer – Motion Control Technician ("Caretaker")
  • Bob Scribner – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Tony Sears – Art Department Assistant ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Fernando Sepulveda – Swing Gang Lead Person ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Daren Sherman – Second Second Assistant Director/Additional Second Assistant Director: Re-shoots ("Caretaker")/Second Assistant Director ("Time and Again"–"Ex Post Facto")
  • Mark Shostrom &Ndash; Makeup Artist ("Parallax", "Eye of the Needle", "State of Flux", "Jetrel")/2nd Unit Makeup Artist ("Phage"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Tom Siegel – Costumer ("Parallax", "Phage", "Eye of the Needle", "Emanations", "State of Flux", "Cathexis", "Jetrel")
  • Debbie Silverman – Animal Wrangler: Critters of the Cinema ("Caretaker")
  • Judith Silverman – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Adele Simmons – 2nd Unit First Assistant Director ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")
  • Adam Richard Sklena – Extra Camera Assistant ("The Cloud")
  • B. Smith – Grip ("Caretaker")
  • Smith – Extra Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Richard Snell – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker")
  • L. Spadaccin – Teleprompter Operator: Q-TV 2nd Unit Paramount Promo ("The Cloud")
  • Tim Stell – Motion Control Camera Operator: Image G ("Caretaker")
  • Mark Stimson – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")/2nd Unit Special Effects Person ("Learning Curve")
  • Phil Stirling – 2nd Unit Boom Operator ("Time and Again", "The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Cathexis")/Sound Cable Person ("Jetrel")/Mike Operator ("Learning Curve") (also listed as "R. Stirling")
  • B. Stradling – 2nd Unit Camera Operator ("Time and Again"–"Eye of the Needle")/Extra Camera Assistant ("The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto"–"Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", "Faces")
  • J. Stradling – 2nd Unit Second Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker")
  • Michael Stradling – 2nd Unit First Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker"–"Emanations", "State of Flux"–"Jetrel")/First Assistant Camera Operator/Film Loader ("Caretaker")/Second Assistant Camera Operator ("Caretaker"–"Ex Post Facto", "Prime Factors"–"Learning Curve")
  • Robert Stromberg – Matte Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Surika – Grip ("Caretaker")
  • Thomas E. Surprenant – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Phage", "Learning Curve")
  • Ken Suzuki – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Gerald Szillinsky – Crab Dolly Grip ("Caretaker"–"Heroes and Demons")
  • Tandy – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • S. Tate – 2nd Unit Extra Camera Operator ("Time and Again"–"The Cloud")
  • Taylor – Electrician ("Caretaker")
  • Jamie Thomas – Costumer ("Time and Again", "The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto", "Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", "Faces", "Learning Curve")
  • Kimberly Thompson – Costumer ("Caretaker", "Time and Again", "The Cloud", Ex Post Facto", "Prime Factors", "Heroes and Demons", "Faces", "Learning Curve")
  • Wil Thoms – Special Effects Artist ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Erik Tiemens – Main Title Storyboard/Design: Santa Barbara Studios ("Caretaker")
  • Toral – Craft Service ("Caretaker")
  • Nancy P. Townsend – Additional Second Assistant Director ("Caretaker")
  • Chris Trent – Foley Mixer ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Jerry Trent – Foley Artist ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Barry Tugendhaft – Greensperson ("Prime Factors")
  • Donna Turner-Culver – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Pernell Youngblood Tyus – Camera Operator ("Time and Again", "Phage"–"The Cloud", "Ex Post Facto")
  • Faith Vecchio – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Patricia Vecchio – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • Patrick J. Vitolla – Grip ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • S. Volpe – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Walker – First Assistant Camera Operator ("Cathexis")
  • Lazard Ward – Set Security ("Caretaker"–"Learning Curve")
  • Wyatt Weed – Visual Effects: Miniatures ("Caretaker")
  • Mark Wendell – Digital Effects Artist: Santa Barbara Studios ("Caretaker", "The Cloud")
  • Karen Westerfield – Makeup Artist ("Caretaker", "Heroes and Demons")
  • Scott Wheeler – Makeup Artist ("Time and Again", "Ex Post Facto", "Heroes and Demons", "Learning Curve")
  • White – Hair Stylist ("Caretaker")
  • Joe White – Visual Effects Artist ("Caretaker")
  • Chris Whitman – Electrician/Lamp Operator ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • R. Wilbar – 2nd Unit First Assistant Camera Operator ("Learning Curve")
  • J. Williams – 2nd Unit Sound Video Blue Box Operator ("Emanations", "State of Flux")/Boom Operator ("Ex Post Facto")
  • Natalie Wood – Lens Tech ("Faces"–"Jetrel")/Makeup Artist ("Jetrel")
  • Edmond Wright – 2nd Unit Key Grip ("Caretaker"–"Parallax")
  • Brad Yacobian – Line Producer ("Parallax")

Production companies [ ]

  • Brazil-Fabrication & Design – Visual Effects
  • Cogswell Video Services, Inc. – Post Production Video Company ("Faces")
  • Critters of the Cinema – Animals ("Caretaker", "The Cloud", Ex Post Facto")
  • Cynthia's Distinctive Catering – Catering ("Caretaker", "Eye of the Needle")
  • Digital Filmworks – Special Visual Effects ("Caretaker")
  • Joan Pearce Research Associates – Research Company (Pre-Production)
  • Mario's – Catering ("Caretaker")
  • Michaelsons – Catering ("Caretaker")
  • The Arrangement – Catering ("State of Flux")
  • VisionArt Design & Animation – Digital Effects ("Caretaker")

Media releases [ ]

  • VOY Season 1 UK VHS
  • VOY Season 1 US VHS
  • VOY Season 1 DVD

External links [ ]

  • Star Trek: Voyager season 1 at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • Star Trek: Voyager Season One Credits at StarTrek.com
  • Star Trek Voyager Season 1 episode reviews  at Ex Astris Scientia
  • 2 Gary Graham
  • 3 USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-G)

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Star Trek: Voyager – Season 3, Episode 1

Where to watch, star trek: voyager - season 3, episode 1.

Buy Star Trek: Voyager - Season 3, Episode 1 on Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, Apple TV.

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Star Trek: Voyager - Episode Guide - Season 3

The slo-o-o-o-ow evolutionary progress of Star Trek: Voyager continues in season 3, as the show finally starts to more closely resemble, you know, Star Trek.

Voyager season 3 is still fairly uneven in quality, but some good old ST staples still get some good use in this season. The crew experiences trippy time paradoxes in “Coda” and “Before and After”, while the entire ship visits the 1990s a la Star Trek IV in “Future’s End.” The holodeck, well more used in Voyager than in any other ST series, is done extremely effectively in the ripping yarn “Worst Case Scenario” and the surprisingly interesting “Real Life.” (To be fair, however, there is “Alter Ego”…)

1. Basics, Part II – Talk about your pat resolutions: The Voyager crew survives in Stone Age conditions for about six hours of so and befriends a shaman while Paris, with the assistance of the Doctor, rounds up some galactic cavalry and Voyager is returned with nary a scratch. O yeah, Seska dies and the baby for which Janeway and Chakotay were willing to sacrifice ship and crew is never heard about again. **

2. Flashback – In Voyager’s version of “Trials and Tribble-ations,” Tuvok and Janeway mentally travel back to Tuvok’s time on the Excelsior, which awesomely intersects with the events of Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country, and gives Captain Sulu an opportunity to kick a little ass. ****

3. The Chute – With no knowledge of how they arrived, Paris and Kim find themselves in a prison straight out of Escape from New York. Kim’s sad attempts to act the aggressive badass are thankfully outweighed by a neat twist or two. ***

4. The Swarm – Janeway et al attempt to maneuver Voyage through a space packed with a swarm of small ships, but it’s Robert Picardo who deservedly gets the quality screen time. The Doctor’s memory is rapidly degrading and so B’Elanna crafts a holodeck program of the EMH’s designer, Dr. Zimmerman, to assist. ***

5. False Profits – Full disclosure: Star Trek Guide digs the Ferengi as fantastic satirical content on consumerism, so that may bias this synopsis. So … remember the dudes looking to bid on rights to a wormhole in the ST:TNG episode “The Price”? This is what happened to them after traveling through the ultimately unstable wormhole: The two conniving Ferengi found ways to exploit the local mythology of a nearby planet to their advantage; clearly The Prime Directive has no business (so to speak) conflicting with the Laws of Acquisition… ****

6. Remember – B’Elanna has recurring dreams which appear to be induced by visiting aliens called Enarans ; these are a side effect of an attempt to repress certain bits of Enaran history or something, but we’re still trying to figure out why Torres was susceptible rather than the Vulcans and Betazoids kicking around…**

7. Sacred Ground – Metaphysics and subatomic physics collide in a story that would likely have had Gene Roddenberry foaming at the mouth. When Kes is left comatose outside of a monastery while on shore leave, Janeway must take a less than scientific approach to restoring her to consciousness. **

8. Future's End, Part I – Kinda like Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home except not quite as humorous and set in the 1990s. An interesting time-travel tale which includes time travelers from the 29th century and Voyager’s escape into the 20th, where an unknown event will destroy the Earth 1,000 years later. Interesting stuff made even more compelling with Ed Begley Jr. playing an EEEvil Steve Jobs. ****

9. Future's End, Part II – Part II keeps the tension and intrigue high, while giving Tuvok and Paris some a few funny bits. Time ticks away as the unanswered questions demand resolution: Can Henry Starling be stopped? How will Voyager return to the 29th century? Does The Doctor get to keep that dope mobile emitter? And will Paris bag that attitudinal 90’s chick? ****

10. Warlord – An alien warlord takes control of Kes’s mind and whoa are the results boring … *

11. The Q and the Grey – Kind of like two Q-centric episodes put together: Q tries to convince Janeway to have a baby with him (guess he should have been around for Kes’s Elogium), and then reveals that Janeway’s decision in “Death Wish” has led to a civil war among the Q that’s having deleterious effects in the standard four-dimensional plane of existence. ***

12. Macrocosm – The classic virus-from-another-planet Star Trek trope goes one step further when a “macrovirus” invade Voyager. Watchable despite the silly presence, basically because The Doctor and Janeway are ultimately the only ones standing (literally). **

13. Fair Trade – Neelix finally admits that he knows nothing about the space they’re traveling through and goes on to whine about his uselessness. And then he gets scammed out of Voyager resources thanks to an “old friend.” **

14. Alter Ego – Kim and Tuvok vie for the affections of a holodeck babe, which then (sigh) comes to life outside the holodeck. *

15. Coda – Head trip for Janeway: The captain appears to be trapped in a time loop involving various death scenarios before the plot line takes a crazy left turn into the afterlife. ***

16. Blood Fever – Another rule of Voyager: Any story line involving B’Elanna Torres flipping out can immediately be labeled a non-classic. In this pretty silly episode. Tuvok goes through Pon Farr – and “passes it” to B’Elanna. I know, right? 0

17. Unity – In an episode set just outside of Borg space, a couple of subplots featuring the deadly force involve the investigation of a dead Borg cube and rogue Borg units who have (mostly) de-assimilated from the collective. ****

18. Darkling – Picardo gets to chew the scenery a bit in this one, based on an attempt by the Doctor to expand his personality. Unfortunately, this experiment goes awry and a Mr. Hyde type emerges at random. ***

19. Rise – Tuvok and Neelix (gods help us) crash land a shuttle (no kidding). Sensors and transporters aren’t working (imagine that) because reasons, so Neelix lies, claiming to know how to repair the nearby space elevator; also, there’s a bomb aboard. And Neelix squeakily complains that Tuvok doesn’t respect him. *

20. Favorite Son – In a plot line straight out of Kirk’s playbook, Kim is revealed to actually be a member of another species and is recalled to a planet where women are the vast majority, so even the ensign can get some. Or so he thinks … **

21. Before and After – Head trip for Kes: She suddenly finds herself years in the future and saddled with a terminal disease. She then begins traveling backward through her life. ***

22. Real Life – The Doctor creates a too-perfect family with whom to interact on the holodeck, so it’s a good thing that Anson Williams of Happy Days fame is aboard to direct. Includes a surprisingly touching ending. ***

23. Distant Origin – A nice script steadily unpacks a compelling tale about a reptilian scientist who believe their species evolved from humans. This one includes a very interesting reaction to the typical stirring speech by Chakotay as well… ****

24. Displaced – Head trip turns into invasion, as Voyager crew members are replaced one at a time by aliens who’ve discovered quite the unique pilfering strategy… ***

25. Worst Case Scenario – This show may take (justifiable) flak for overusing the holodeck, but at least three Voyager episodes make the list of top ST stories using the device. This is the first of the best. When a mysterious, anonymously-programmer holo-program starring the Voyager bridge crew and set in a time of Maquis rebellion, nearly everyone on board is obsessed. When the “author” is revealed to be Tuvok and the “holonovel” actually a training exercise, the crew nevertheless encourage him to finish writing; Paris offers to lend a hand. ****

26. Scorpion, Part I – The wussification of the Borg begun in the post-Best of Both Worlds seasons of ST:TNG continues, as the Voyager crew discovers a totally badass bunch of dudes known only as Species 8472. The Borg then condescend to negotiate (!) with Janeway regarding safe passage though Borg space in order for assistance with the 8472s.

ScreenRant

10 Best Star Trek Episodes of 2023 Ranked

  • Picard Season 3 reunites the crew of The Next Generation on the USS Enterprise-D, bringing back that classic Trek feel.
  • Strange New Worlds establishes itself as the best new Star Trek show with its sophomore season, including the first live-action/animated crossover and a musical episode.
  • Lower Decks Season 4 reveals more connections to The Next Generation than ever before, making it a must-watch for Trek fans.

With three new seasons of Star Trek content, 2023 was a great year for the franchise, with some truly phenomenal episodes that will join the ranks of past Trek classics . The first new Trek of the year came in February 2023 with the premiere of Star Trek: Picard season 3. Picard season 3 not only felt more reminiscent of classic Trek than the show's first two seasons, but it also reunited the crew of Star Trek: The Next Generation on the rebuilt USS Enterprise-D.

Star Trek: Strange New Worlds dropped ten new episodes over the summer, including Trek's first live-action/animated crossover, as well as the first-ever Star Trek musical . With its sophomore season, Strange New Worlds has established itself as Star Trek's best new show . Then in September, Star Trek: Lower Decks had its best season yet with season 4, which revealed even more connections to TNG than ever. All three of these Star Trek series added some great new episodes to the franchise, making 2023 one of the best years for Trek fans.

15 Best New Star Trek Characters Introduced In 2023

"twovix" - star trek: lower decks, season 4, episode 1.

Much of Star Trek: Lower Decks season 4 focuses on Lt. Beckett Mariner (Tawny Newsome) and her tumultuous relationship with Starfleet, but the season premiere gives all of the lower deckers a chance to shine. While Lower Decks is always full of references to previous Trek , "Twovix" focuses specifically on Star Trek: Voyager . As the USS Cerritos escorts Voyager to Earth, Commander Billips (Paul Scheer) and Dr. T’Ana (Gillian Vigman) find themselves merged together - or Tuvixed - just like Lt. Tuvok (Tim Russ) and Neelix (Ethan Phillips) in one of Voyager's most talked-about episodes, "Tuvix." Not only does this season premiere set up the season-long plot and character arcs, but it's also a hilarious love letter to Voyager and a must-watch episode of Lower Decks .

"Seventeen Seconds" - Star Trek: Picard

Season 3, episode 3.

"Seventeen Seconds" progresses several different storylines, but the real highlight of the episode is the conversation between Admiral Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) and Dr. Beverly Crusher (Gates McFadden) in the USS Titan's sickbay. After the shocking reveal that Beverly's son Jack Crusher (Ed Speleers) is Picard's son as well, the two former lovers have a long-awaited heart-to-heart. Gates McFadden and Patrick Stewart both knock this scene out of the park, delivering nuanced and captivating performances as Beverly explains her reasoning for keeping Jack from Picard. The scene ends with the two at an impasse as the situation with the USS Titan and the Shrike goes from bad to worse.

"Old Friends, New Planets" - Star Trek: Lower Decks

Season 4, episode 10.

Star Trek : Lower Decks season 4 finale wonderfully resolves all of the plot threads of the season in a way that ties in nicely with Mariner's character arc. "Old Friends, New Planets" begins with a flashback to Nick Locarno's (Robert Duncan McNeill) Starfleet Academy days, just before the accident that killed his fellow cadet and got Locarno kicked out of Starfleet. Back in the present, Nick mistakenly believes that Mariner will join him (since they attended the Academy together), but she instead starts working to stop him. With all the usual shout-outs to previous Star Trek projects and wonderful character development for Mariner in particular , "Old Friends, New Planets" brings Lower Decks' best season yet to a close with a bang.

The episode's opening flashback occurs before TNG season 5, episode 19, "The First Duty," which depicts the fallout of Nova Squadron's accident. Wil Wheaton, Shannon Fill, and Robert Duncan McNeill all reprise their roles from the TNG episode, as Cadets Wesley Crusher, Sito Jaxa, and Nick Locarno, respectively.

"Under The Cloak Of War" - Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

Season 2, episode 8.

In its two seasons so far, Strange New Worlds has embraced the wonder of Star Trek , telling stories reminiscent of the best episodes of TOS and TNG . But "Under The Cloak Of War" takes a page out of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's book to tell a darker story that examines the lasting effects of war. When Klingon Ambassador Dak'Rah (Robert Wisdom) visits the USS Enterprise, the crew members who fought in the Klingon/Federation War question the former War General's motives. Dr. Joseph M'Benga (Babs Olusanmokun) steals the episode as he struggles with his past and his PTSD, ultimately making a shocking decision that stands directly at odds with the philosophy of Captain Christopher Pike (Anson Mount).

"The Inner Fight" - Star Trek: Lower Decks

Season 4, episode 9.

The penultimate episode of Star Trek: Lower Decks season 4 brings the focus back to Mariner, nicely building on everything that came before to reveal more about her backstory. The big reveal connects Mariner to the TNG episode where Lower Decks got its name and the death of Enterprise-D Ensign Sito Jaxa. Stranded on the planet Sherbal V, Mariner has a heart-to-heart with a Klingon warrior before being kidnapped by disgraced former Starfleet cadet Nick Locarno, who is revealed to be the season's big bad. A lot happens in "The Inner Fight," but it still has all the usual trappings of Lower Decks - numerous references to past Trek and lots of humor and heart.

While searching for information about recent attacks on non-Federation ships, Captain Carol Freeman shows why she's the captain by tricking a broker on the lawless planet of New Axton.

"No Win Scenario" - Star Trek: Picard

Season 3, episode 4.

As the USS Titan sinks into the gravity well of a nebula, Captain Liam Shaw (Todd Stashwick), Picard, and the rest of the crew grapple with their impending deaths, while desperately searching for solutions. Every main character gets something to do in "No Win Scenario," and all of the stories come together well. Jean-Luc seeks to spend some time with the son he didn't know he had, Commander Seven of Nine (Jeri Ryan) works to uncover a Changeling in disguise, and Dr. Crusher discovers a pattern in the electrical waves buffeting the ship. Everyone comes together to pull off the plan that saves the Titan, and the reveal that the nebula is full of bio-electrical lifeforms feels very Star Trek in the best way.

While Jean-Luc and Jack get to know one another on the holodeck, Captain Shaw interrupts Picard's stories to tell a story of his own about his experience during the Battle of Wolf 359 - in which Starfleet lost 11,000 officers to the Borg. This scene recontextualizes Shaw as a character, and "No Win Scenario" deserves a spot on this list for Todd Stashwick's masterful delivery alone.

"Ad Astra Per Aspera" - Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

Season 2, episode 2.

Since the early days of Star Trek: The Original Series , the franchise has always loved a good courtroom drama, and Strange New Worlds season 2's trial episode is of the best. Strange New Worlds season 1 ended with Number One (Rebecca Romijn) being taken into custody for lying on her Starfleet Academy application about being a genetically enhanced Illyrian. "Ad Astra Per Aspera" follows up on that cliffhanger by showing Una's trial. With her childhood friend Neera Ketoul (played beautifully by Yetide Badaki) as her defense lawyer, Una passionately explains why she joined Starfleet. With solid performances from everyone involved, "Ad Astra Per Aspera" feels like classic Star Trek at its best, a celebration of hope, diversity, and humanity.

"Those Old Scientists" - Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

Season 2, episode 7.

The Strange New Worlds / Lower Decks crossover is pure joy from start to finish. When Ensign Boimler travels through a portal, he finds himself in the past with the crew of the USS Enterprise (" NCC-1701 dash... nothing" ), much to his delight. As Captain Pike and his crew try to figure out how to get Boimler back to his time, Ensign Mariner comes through the portal to join him. Jack Quaid and Tawny Newsome both brilliantly bring their characters to live action, and their interactions with the Enterprise crew are truly hilarious and sometimes heartwarming. "Those Old Scientists" will go down as one of Star Trek's best episodes, as it wonderfully celebrates the excitement and joy of traveling through the galaxy for a living.

"The Last Generation" - Star Trek: Picard

Season 3, episode 10.

Star Trek: Picard season 3 fully embraced nostalgia, bringing together the crew of the USS Enterprise-D and concluding a story that began over thirty years ago. TNG already had one perfect finale in "All Good Things..." and "The Last Generation" acknowledges that with its final scene of the core TNG crew sitting down for a game of poker. The conclusion to the season's storyline works well, but it's almost beside the point.

It's the characters and their reunion on the Enterprise-D, their connections with one another, that makes "The Last Generation" work as well as it does. From the message sent out by Federation President Anton Chekov (voiced by Walter Koenig) to Data's (Brent Spiner) excitement at piloting the Enterprise through the Borg cube to Counselor Deanna Troi (Marina Sirtis) psychically tracking her Imzadi, "The Last Generation" is a nostalgic tour-de-force that ends the story of the crew of the Enterprise-D on a high note.

A scene during the closing credits reveals that Jean-Luc's old nemesis Q (John de Lancie) has returned to annoy Jack Crusher in his new position on the Enterprise-G. While this hints at a potential spin-off, the long-rumored Star Trek: Legacy has yet to be announced.

"Subspace Rhapsody" - Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

Season 2, episode 9.

Star Trek's first-ever musical has no right to be as amazing as it is, but everything about this episode just works. From the opening number that has everyone singing their status updates to Spock's soulful break-up song to the Klingon K-pop interlude, "Subspace Rhapsody" is hilarious while remaining true to the characters. The musical numbers and spot-on lyrics allow the characters to reveal things about themselves they would normally keep hidden. This makes for great character development, and many of the revelations in this episode have lasting repercussions.

Every cast member sounds great (with Celia Rose Gooding and Christina Chong as particular standouts), and everything about the episode makes it clear how well the writers understand the characters. "Subspace Rhapsody" is unabashedly a musical extravaganza, but it's also just a phenomenal episode of Star Trek . The scientific explanation for the whole scenario does not really matter, as it's the characters that make Star Trek's first musical a resounding success and the best Trek episode of 2023.

Star Trek: Picard , Star Trek: Lower Decks , and Star Trek: Strange New Worlds are available to stream on Paramount+.

10 Best Star Trek Episodes of 2023 Ranked

  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

Star Trek: Voyager

Episode list

Star trek: voyager.

John K. Shull in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E1 ∙ Basics, Part II

George Takei in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E2 ∙ Flashback

Robert Duncan McNeill in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E3 ∙ The Chute

Robert Picardo and Carole Davis in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E4 ∙ The Swarm

Rob LaBelle, Christine Artecona-Cornell, Leslie Jordan, Dan Shor, and Kimm Collinsworth in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E5 ∙ False Profits

Robert Beltran and Roxann Dawson in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E6 ∙ Remember

Kate Mulgrew in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E7 ∙ Sacred Ground

Robert Beltran, Robert Duncan McNeill, Kate Mulgrew, and Tim Russ in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E8 ∙ Future's End

Robert Duncan McNeill, Tim Russ, and Sarah Silverman in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E9 ∙ Future's End, Part II

Jennifer Lien and Galyn Görg in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E10 ∙ Warlord

Robert Beltran and Kate Mulgrew in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E11 ∙ The Q and the Grey

Kate Mulgrew and Ethan Phillips in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E12 ∙ Macrocosm

Ethan Phillips in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E13 ∙ Fair Trade

Sandra Nelson, Tim Russ, and Garrett Wang in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E14 ∙ Alter Ego

Robert Beltran and Kate Mulgrew in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E15 ∙ Coda

Robert Picardo and Alexander Enberg in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E16 ∙ Blood Fever

Robert Beltran in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E17 ∙ Unity

Robert Picardo, Christopher Clarke, Noel De Souza, and Ethan Phillips in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E18 ∙ Darkling

Kate Mulgrew, Kelly Connell, Alan Oppenheimer, and Tim Russ in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E19 ∙ Rise

Robert Picardo and Garrett Wang in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E20 ∙ Favorite Son

Jennifer Lien in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E21 ∙ Before and After

Robert Picardo, Glenn Walker Harris Jr., Lindsey Haun, and Wendy Schaal in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E22 ∙ Real Life

Christopher Liam Moore and Henry Woronicz in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E23 ∙ Distant Origin

Robert Duncan McNeill, Roxann Dawson, and Kenneth Tigar in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

S3.E24 ∙ Displaced

Robert Beltran and Martha Hackett in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

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Robert Beltran and Kate Mulgrew in Star Trek: Raumschiff Voyager (1995)

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Robert Beltran, Jennifer Lien, Robert Duncan McNeill, Kate Mulgrew, Robert Picardo, Jeri Ryan, Roxann Dawson, Ethan Phillips, Tim Russ, and Garrett Wang in Star Trek: Voyager (1995)

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Ds9's 3-part season 2 premiere was a star trek game changer.

Deep Space Nine season 2 did something brand-new for the Star Trek franchise - a three-part story - fully establishing DS9 as a game-changing show.

  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine season 2 broke the mold by fully committing to serialized storytelling, setting the stage for future franchise entries.
  • The three-part opener of DS9 season 2 introduced a game-changing political thriller that showcased the show's ability to tell long-form stories.
  • The serialization of DS9 allowed for deeper exploration of complex themes and character-driven narratives that traditional episodic Star Trek shows couldn't achieve.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine season 2 began with a three-part story, which was a game changer for the future of Star Trek . Serialization was always at the heart of DS9 , as it sought to differentiate itself from Star Trek: The Next Generation . This was a controversial approach for Paramount, who had previously outlawed any serialization on TNG , due to syndication agreements with local networks. As syndicated shows were often screened out of sequence, it would be impossible for viewers to follow anything longer than a Star Trek two-parter.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine season 2 bucked this trend by fully committing to serialized storytelling with a three-part opener . The brainchild of DS9 producer Michael Piller, season 2's epic political thriller was a forerunner to Star Trek: DS9 's Dominion War arc . Having successfully proved that DS9 was capable of telling long-form stories with its three-part opener, season 2 began seeding the existence of the Dominion, building toward the big reveal in season 2's finale, "The Jem'Hadar." DS9 's new approach to storytelling in Sta r Trek completely changed the game for future franchise entries .

“Anti-Serialization” Was Voyager’s Weakness Compared To DS9, Says Star Trek: Discovery Creator

Ds9 season 2 opened with star trek’s first ever three parter.

Star Trek: Deep Space season 1 had already broken a Star Trek: The Next Generation season finale tradition with "In the Hands of the Prophets" by not ending on a cliffhanger. DS9 season 2 continued to break TNG traditions by opening with Star Trek 's first ever three-part story. This was a conscious decision by Michael Piller, who had also instructed the DS9 writers room to break away from trying to replicate TNG . The so-called Circle trilogy that tackled themes like religious fundamentalism and people's need for heroes was reflective of the types of character-led stories that DS9 would excel at.

It's ironic that Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's three-part game changer had its roots in an unmade Star Trek: The Next Generation episode. Jeri Taylor had previously pitched the story of a Bajoran freedom fighter being rescued by Ensign Ro Laren (Michelle Forbes) for TNG season 6. Instead, the core idea was developed into what would become the first chapter of DS9 's political thriller about the future of Bajor. It's a perfect example of how Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's serialization was better equipped to tell stories that the episodic TNG could only scratch the surface of.

DS9’s Three-Part Opener Was a Game Changer for Star Trek

Star Trek: Voyager avoided replicating Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's serialization, and so Star Trek: Enterprise season 4's Arik Soong trilogy was the first Star Trek three-parter since DS9 's Circle trilogy . Enterprise was aided in this serialized storytelling thanks to its consistent time slot and support by their network, UPN. Television had also drastically changed in the time between Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Star Trek: Enterprise . Shows like The Sopranos were blazing a trail on HBO, while network shows like The West Wing were also heavily serialized.

By the time Star Trek returned to TV screens with Star Trek: Discovery in 2017, it would have been bizarre if the show didn't serialize the story of the Klingon War. Years later, while Star Trek: Strange New Worlds is praised for its traditional episodic approach to storytelling, the events of those episodes often have lasting consequences for the crew of the USS Enterprise. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 's serialization blazed a trail from day one, and while it wasn't fully appreciated at the time, it freshened up the franchise and gave writers new ways to tell the story of Starfleet's ongoing mission.

All episodes of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine are available to stream on Paramount+.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, also known as DS9, is the fourth series in the long-running Sci-Fi franchise, Star Trek. DS9 was created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, and stars Avery Brooks, René Auberjonois, Terry Farrell, and Cirroc Lofton. This particular series follows a group of individuals in a space station near a planet called Bajor.

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  4. Watch Star Trek: Voyager Season 1 Episode 3

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  1. Voyager Reviewed! (by an ar*ehole) S1E04: TIME AND AGAIN

  2. 10 Best Star Trek: Voyager Episodes Not About The Main Cast

  3. Star Trek Voyager: Season 5 Episode 6 Timeless

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  5. Janeway and the Vidiians

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COMMENTS

  1. List of Star Trek: Voyager episodes

    Series overview Episodes Season 1 (1995) Season 2 (1995-96) The last four episodes of season 1 were moved to season 2 (the episodes with stardates 48xxx). "The 37's" was originally filmed as season 1's finale. Season 3 (1996-97)

  2. Parallax (Star Trek: Voyager)

    " Parallax " is the third episode of the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager. The episode was directed by Kim Friedman and broadcast on January 23, 1995. [1] The story was written by Jim Trombetta with the teleplay by Brannon Braga. [2] The starship Voyager detects a distress call and stops to investigate. [3] Casting

  3. Star Trek: Voyager (TV Series 1995-2001)

    S1.E1 ∙ Caretaker Mon, Jan 16, 1995 While pursuing the trail of Maquis rebels, a newly commissioned Starfleet ship gets pulled to the far side of the galaxy. 7.4 /10 (4.2K) Rate Watch options S1.E2 ∙ Parallax

  4. Star Trek: Voyager: Season 1, Episode 3

    Madame Web Most Anticipated Movies 1984 Movies Star Trek: Voyager - Season 1, Episode 3 Vudu Amazon Prime Video Apple TV Buy Star Trek: Voyager - Season 1, Episode 3 on Vudu, Amazon Prime...

  5. "Star Trek: Voyager" Time and Again (TV Episode 1995)

    S1. E3 All episodes Cast & crew User reviews Trivia IMDbPro All topics Time and Again Episode aired Jan 30, 1995 TV-PG 45m IMDb RATING 7.1 /10 2.3K YOUR RATING Rate Action Adventure Sci-Fi The Voyager crew discovers a planet which recently suffered a horrific catastrophe.

  6. "Star Trek: Voyager" Future's End (TV Episode 1996)

    Future's End: Directed by David Livingston. With Kate Mulgrew, Robert Beltran, Roxann Dawson, Jennifer Lien. A timeship from the future who tries to stop Voyager gets thrown with Voyager into the twentieth century. His timeship is found in the 1960's and Voyager finds a company that has benefited from its technology exists in 1996.

  7. Watch Star Trek: Voyager Season 1 Episode 3: Parallax

    Parallax S1 E3 46M TV-PG The reality of co-existence hits Maquis and Starfleet personnel alike, but the troubled but brilliant B'Elanna Torres is made chief engineer after solving a baffling spatial mystery with Janeway.

  8. Watch Star Trek: Voyager Season 1

    Watch with Paramount+. Start your 7-day free trial. Buy Episode 1. SD $1.99. Buy Season 1. SD $25.19. Redeem a gift card or promotion code. While searching for a missing officer, Captain Kathryn Janeway and the crew of the Starship Voyager are swept 70,000 light years from home. The reality of co-existence hits Maquis and Starfleet personnel ...

  9. Star Trek: Voyager

    About the best we can say for Voyager's inaugural year is that a writer's strike ultimately truncated the season, thereby limiting the obvious awkward growing pains. At just sixteen episodes, this is the shortest season since the animated series days. Star Trek: Voyager season 1 - Is the first of many years' worth of blunted potential. 1-2.

  10. Time and Again (Star Trek: Voyager)

    Janeway and Paris become caught in one, finding themselves on the planet the day before the explosion. Quickly integrating themselves into the general population, they learn that the planet's civilization is powered by a volatile form of energy known as "polaric" energy, an option that has been met with some protest.

  11. Watch Star Trek: Voyager Season 1

    Season 1. The wildly successful Star Trek franchise continues as Capt. Kathryn Janeway and the crew of the U.S.S. Voyager follow a Maquis ship into the Badlands, and one species-saving decision later, find themselves in the Delta Quadrant, 70,000 light years away from the Alpha Quadrant, the Federation, and home. 1995 1 episode.

  12. Time and Again (episode)

    "Time and Again" VOY, Episode 1x04 Production number: 40841-104 First aired: 30 January 1995 ← 3rd of 168 produced in VOY → ← 3rd of 168 released in VOY → ← 345th of 908 released in all → Teleplay by David Kemper and Michael Piller Story by David Kemper Directed by Les Landau In-universe date Unknown ( 2371 )

  13. VOY Season 1

    In the UK, these four episodes were originally screened and released on video as part of Season 1. Filming on this season wrapped on 12 May 1995. (Star Trek Monthly issue 5, p. 10) In its final form, the season is comprised of one episode ("Caretaker") consisting of a teaser and eight acts, six episodes ("Parallax "-" Ex Post Facto") that ...

  14. Star Trek: Voyager (TV Series 1995-2001)

    44 Play trailer 2:18 2 Videos 99+ Photos Action Adventure Sci-Fi Pulled to the far side of the galaxy, where the Federation is seventy-five years away at maximum warp speed, a Starfleet ship must cooperate with Maquis rebels to find a way home. Creators Rick Berman Michael Piller Jeri Taylor Stars Kate Mulgrew Robert Beltran Roxann Dawson

  15. Caretaker (Star Trek: Voyager)

    The Emergency Medical Hologram is activated to treat the injured. Before determining their bearings, the crew is transported to a holographic simulation aboard a nearby array controlled by a being known as the Caretaker. Seeing through the simulation, the Voyager crew discover the unconscious Maquis crew undergoing strange medical experiments.

  16. Star Trek: Voyager: Season 3, Episode 1

    Star Trek: Voyager - Season 3, Episode 1 Episode Info In Theaters At Home TV Shows Janeway and the crew face hostile natives on a primitive planet; the Kazon plan to annihilate most of...

  17. "Star Trek: Voyager" Jetrel (TV Episode 1995)

    Jetrel: Directed by Kim Friedman. With Kate Mulgrew, Robert Beltran, Roxann Dawson, Jennifer Lien. Neelix is diagnosed with a fatal illness by a Haakonian named Jetrel. The same man who'd developed a doomsday weapon which destroyed a Talaxian moon and killed Neelix's family.

  18. Star Trek: Voyager

    Voyager season 3 is still fairly uneven in quality, but some good old ST staples still get some good use in this season. The crew experiences trippy time paradoxes in "Coda" and "Before and After", while the entire ship visits the 1990s a la Star Trek IV in "Future's End."

  19. Star Trek: Lower Decks

    In Voyager season 1, episode 3, "Parallax," the crew find themselves trapped inside a type-4 quantam singularity that alters the experience of time, following their attempt to rescue a ship in distress (which was actually their own ship, in the future).With the destruction of the U.S.S. Voyager imminent, the crew's best option is to escape through the rift the ship created when it entered the ...

  20. Basics (Star Trek: Voyager)

    The natives attempt to smoke them out with a fire. Back at camp, Ensign Wildman 's baby Naomi falls ill and Chakotay's team is still missing. Janeway gathers her own crew to search for Chakotay. Inside the caverns, a mis-step leads to a crew member being eaten by the worm. Janeway has Lt. Torres and two others distract the natives.

  21. 10 Best Star Trek Episodes of 2023 Ranked

    10 Best Star Trek Episodes of 2023 Ranked. Story by Rachel Hulshult • 4w. Picard Season 3 reunites the crew of The Next Generation on the USS Enterprise-D, bringing back that classic Trek feel ...

  22. Star Trek: Voyager (TV Series 1995-2001)

    S3.E1 ∙ Basics, Part II Wed, Sep 4, 1996 With almost the entire crew of Voyager marooned on a desolate planet by the Kazon, Tom Paris heads out to fetch help while Lon Suder and the Doctor, still on Voyager, try to assist. 7.8 /10 (1.9K) Rate S3.E2 ∙ Flashback Wed, Sep 11, 1996

  23. DS9's 3-Part Season 2 Premiere Was A Star Trek Game Changer

    Star Trek: Voyager avoided replicating Star Trek: Deep Space Nine's serialization, and so Star Trek: Enterprise season 4's Arik Soong trilogy was the first Star Trek three-parter since DS9's Circle trilogy.Enterprise was aided in this serialized storytelling thanks to its consistent time slot and support by their network, UPN.Television had also drastically changed in the time between Star ...

  24. Heroes and Demons

    Heroes and Demons " Heroes and Demons " is the 12th episode of the first season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager. The episode first aired on the UPN network on April 24, 1995. It was directed by Les Landau and written by former Star Trek: The Next Generation story editor Naren Shankar.

  25. Future's End

    " Future's End " is a two-part episode from the third season of the American science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager, the eighth and ninth of the season and the 50th and 51st overall. "Future's End" made its debut on American television in November 1996 on the UPN network in two separate broadcasts, on November 6 and 13th, 1996.