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Frida Museum In Mexico City

Latest posts, african american history museum virtual tour, burke museum of natural history and culture, museum of fine arts tickets, museum of indian arts and culture santa fe, safety measures and guidelines.

We ask that all visitors, including those who have been vaccinated against COVID-19, follow these safety measures to protect everyones health. Visitors who do not adhere to safety policies and guidelines may be asked to leave.

COVID-19 GUIDELINES AT THE DuSABLE MUSEUM OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY

We look forward to your visit to the DuSable Museum of African American History! The health and safety of our visitors, staff and volunteers is our top priority. Effective immediately all visitors ages five and up will be required to provide proof of vaccination, or a negative PCR Antigen test within 48 hours before entering The DuSable Museum.

Visitors ages 12 and older must be fully vaccinated showing that they have at least two doses of an FDA authorized vaccine or one dose of the Janssen/Johnson & Johnson vaccine. International visitors must provide proof of vaccination from the vaccines approved for emergency use by the World Health Organization.

Children ages 5 11 years must provide proof of at least one vaccination dose. Guests under the age of 5 are not required to show proof of vaccination but must be accompanied by a fully vaccinated adult.

Proof of vaccination may include:

CDC Vaccination Card

Digital record or phone app

Printed documentation from your vaccine provider

Visitors 18 and older must provide ID with the same identifying information as proof of vaccination such as:

Drivers License

American Battlefield Trust Virtual Battlefield Tours

The State of Pennsylvania Monument is the largest memorial at the Gettysburg battlefield, commemorating the tens of thousands of Pennsylvanians who fought there.

Most on-site battlefield tours require a leap of imagination: the ability to walk around a perfectly peaceful open field and overlay a mental movie of smoke and combat and fallen warriors, all the while considering the military strategy and broader political stakes. ABTs website may not offer the sunshine on your back, but it marries the setting, action and context far more seamlessly, with its 360-degree virtual tours of more than 20 American Revolution and Civil War battlefields. In the Gettysburg tour alone, there are 15 different stopsno walking requiredeach of which features clickable icons with granular detail about all the whos, whats and whys. And when youre done touring, be sure to explore the sites other robust resources, from battle summaries to generals biographies.

Click HERE for the experience.

READ MORE: 7 Important Civil War Battles

Tour D’alexandria Spring Ride: Resilience

Volunteers are needed for the Tour d Alexandria bike ride in . The theme for this ride is resilience and will feature points of interest that reflect the resilience of Alexandria communities past and present, the growth of diverse neighborhoods, and to include the commemoration of the lynching of Joseph McCoy.

The Alexandria Black History Museum is currently closed for renovation. This page has admission information and directions to assist in planning your visit once the museum reopens.

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Connect To Inspiring Authentic Representations Of Life In The 18th And 19th Centuries In A Unique Place Where Black Communities Organized And Advanced The Cause Of Freedom

The African Meeting House, a registered National Historic Landmark, and Abiel Smith School on Beacon Hill were built in the early 1800s and are two of the museum’s most valuable assets. Located steps away from the Massachusetts State House.

Explore our Nantucket campus, which features two historic sites, the African Meeting House and the Florence Higginbotham House. These buildings were at the center of a thriving nineteenth-century African American community on the island.

Smithsonian Museum Virtual Tours

Inside the National Museum of African American History and ...

If youre interested in visiting some of the DCs iconic sites from home, the Smithsonian museum virtual tours are a great option, keep reading for our favorites!

Millions visit Washington, DC each year to explore and visit some of the countrys most iconic landmarks and world-class museums. While many places continue to reopen, some attractions like the Smithsonian Museums are still closed due to COVID.

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Google Arts And Culture Black History Month Collection

Photo by Florencia Viadana on Unsplash

is a wonderful source of online learning opportunities! Check out the Black History Month collections on the Google Arts and Culture site which features videos, photo galleries, virtual tours of museums, and many other works that reflect Black history and culture.

These are some of the exhibits currently available to view:

A Virtual Museum Tour

On September 24, 2016, President Barack Obama 83CC opened the Smithsonians National Museum of African American History and Culture an institution, he said, that seeks to reaffirm that African-American history is not somehow separate from our larger American story. Its not the underside of the American story. It is central to the American story. The four-hundred-thousand square-foot museum, designed by David Adjaye, displays more than three thousand artifacts. Mabel O. Wilson 91GSAPP, a professor at Columbias Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation and a scholar of African-American studies, wrote the official companion book to the museum. Here she highlights some of the buildings most meaningful architectural features.

DISTINCT FAÇADE The building has a triple-tiered corona, a decorative façade that gives it a very distinct shape. It is particularly striking on the National Mall, which is dominated by classical architecture. The tiers are meant to recall hands raised in celebration, and also the West African caryatid, a ceremonial sculpture from Yorubaland, in what is now Nigeria.

OPEN SPACES Most museums have a cloistered, enclosed interior. This museum opens into a huge space with vast floor-to-ceiling windows. You feel suspended between the inside and the outside. The space evokes the clearing field the middle of an open field of crops which was the only community gathering space for many slaves.

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How Did The Revolution Survive Its Darkest Hour

Americans would soon learn that it was one thing to declare independence, and quite another to secure it. The Battle for New York, during the fall of 1776, tested Commander-in-Chief General George Washington and his Continental Army. Travel virtually through the American retreat from New York through the Battles of Long Island, White Plains, and Fort Washington, as 1776 came to a close and American troop numbers and morale began to dwindle.

Exhibit Highlight: Winter at Valley Forge

After the British’s triumphal seizure of Philadelphia, the Continental Army withdrew to Valley Forge in the winter of 1777-78. Read about the common soldiers and families who endured the harsh winter at Valley Forge.

Find the prominently displayed painting and zoom in on the details depicted by William Trego in 1883 as the hardened veterans of the army limped into their winter encampment at Valley Forge. Their bare and bandaged feet leaving trails of blood on the cold ground.

It’s Now Possible To Visit The Smithsonian’s African American History Museum Virtually

The NMAAHC launched a “Searchable Museum” this week, translating its archives and stories into an interactive digital experience. Alan Karchmer/Courtesy of the Smithsonian hide caption

toggle caption

Anyone who’s been to the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture will speak of its elevator ride through time, which takes visitors from the present day to the 15th century and kicks off the first exhibit, Slavery & Freedom . With the launch of a new virtual platform, visitors can now travel on the elevator down to that exhibit without ever leaving their homes.

The Searchable Museum , launched Thursday, transforms the artifacts, stories, and interactive experiences of the physical exhibit into a digital platform where museumgoers can take it in at their own pace.

Eventually, the museum plans to bring all of its exhibits online. The next exhibit, Making a Way Out of No Way , will go online this spring.

“History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived but if faced with courage, need not be lived again, ” echoes Angelou’s voice as a video plays, showing images from the past 600 years of Black history.

Unlike other Smithsonian museums, the NMAAHC has required timed-entry passes to enter the site almost exclusively since it opened in 2016. Though these timed tickets are still free of charge, they can be snapped up pretty quickly: Many tickets for December have already been claimed.

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National Museum Of African American History And Culture

Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture

American History TV presented live coverage from the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall . read more

American History TV presented live coverage from the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Washington, D.C.’s National Mall . They showed exhibits chronicling the African American story from slavery through the inauguration of the first African American president. This featured a selection of artifacts, including a South Carolina slave cabin, Harriet Tubman s hymnal, and a segregated railroad passenger car. Museum curators and William Pretzer , and U.S. Court of Appeals Judge Robert Wilkins also responded to viewer comments and questions. Judge Wilkins is the author of Long Road to Hard Truth: The 100-Year Mission to Create the National Museum of African American History and Culture . close

National Museum Of African Art Virtual Tour

The National Museum of African Art has a collection that includes 9,000 works of traditional and contemporary African art from Sub-Saharan and Arab North Africa.

The institution was first founded in 1964, with a collection focused on traditional African art. It joined the Smithsonian Institution in 1979 and became the National Museum of African Art two years later.

As the Smithsonian Institutions African art museum, it was the first institution dedicated to African art in the United States.

Today the collection is exhibited in a mostly underground museum building that was completed in 1987, just off the National Mall and adjacent to other Smithsonian museums.

The National Museum of African Art collects traditional and contemporary works of historical importance.

The collection ranges from 15th-century sculptures and masks to multi-media contemporary art and includes 300,000 photographs with significant contributions from photojournalists covered major 20th-century events.

The museums library has over 50,000 volumes in visual arts, anthropology, cooking, history, religion, and travel especially works published in Africa.

The Smithsonians National Museum of African Art

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Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle Peabody Essex Museum Salem Massachusetts

From 1954 through 1956, while the civil rights movement was unfolding right before him, the late artist Jacob Lawrence created a series of paintings called Struggle: From the History of the American People. Now, for the first time in more than 60 years, 30 panels from the original collection have been reunited for an exhibition titled Jacob Lawrence: The American Struggle at the Peabody Essex Museum. Beginning with the American Revolution and working its way through 1817, Lawrence directed his attention on such important events as the Boston Tea Party, examining the struggles of a young nation getting its footing from the perspectives of African Americans, Native Americans, women and anyone else whose stories are rarely told in history class. His works are interspersed with those of other contemporary artists, including Derrick Adams and Bethany Collins . Take this virtual tour of the exhibit. On view through August 9.

Portraits Of African Americans National Portrait Gallery Washington Dc

African American Museum Virtual Tour

From former President Barack Obama and former First Lady Michelle Obama to poet Langston Hughes to entrepreneur Madam C. J. Walker, the National Portrait Gallery’s comprehensive exhibit , “Portraits of African Americans,” serves as a whos-who of both well-known and lesser-known history makers. The museum holds, after all, more than 1,000 portraits of African American notables who have made significant contributions to science, the arts, politics and sports. Each portrait includes biographical information about each individual and their importance in history. On view now .

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The National Women’s History Museum Standing Up For Change

The National Womens History Museum launched an online photo exhibition in 2016 documenting the role of Black women during the civil rights movement as leaders, organizers and faces of movements titled Standing up for Change .

The online exhibit features art and documents dating from easily anti-abolition efforts to the mid-20th century. The exhibit states that African American women were the critical mass, the grassroots leaders challenging America to embrace justice and equality for all and that is something that we can definitely stand behind.

History Of The Alexandria Black History Museum

Alexandria Black History Museum incorporates the Robert H. Robinson Library as one of two exhibition galleries. The Robinson Library was originally constructed in 1940 following a sit-in at the segregated Alexandria Library. Learn more about the Sit-Down Strike, the Parker-Gray School and the Alexandria Black History Research Center.

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National Women’s History Museum

Come for the deep well of biographies and digital classroom resources , stay for the wide array of virtual exhibits , many of which are enabled by Google Arts & Culture. For two decades, the National Womens History Museum has been the largest online cultural institution telling the stories of women who helped transform the U.S. Heavy with slide shows and graphics, the virtual exhibits document women making waves in politics, sports, civil rights, science and technology and more. Check out its collection of oral histories from the American Rosie Movement, relaying women’s contributions to the nations defense production.

READ MORE: Womens History Milestones: A Timeline

African American Heritage Sites

Over the course of four centuries, Columbias black community transformed itself from that of a predominately enslaved population to a society whose members overcame the restrictions of Jim Crow and charted the course of the Civil Rights era. The story of this journey remains today within the home places, workplaces, and resting places of Columbias African American community.

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Smithsonian Launches Virtual African American Museum

The NMAAHC recently launched a “Searchable Museum,” translating its archives and stories into an interactive digital experience.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture takes visitors on a tour of the past from the present day back to the 15th century.

A new virtual platform allows visitors to take the journey without leaving their homes. The museum’s artifacts, stories, and interactive experiences can now be explored through the website’s new digital platform known as the Searchable Museum .

“Welcome to the Searchable Museum,” the website states. “A place to explore history and culture through an African American lens.”

The first exhibit titled Slavery & Freedom is available now. The next online exhibit coming in the spring of 2022 is Making a Way Out of No Way.

Poet Maya Angelou narrates the digital experience while visitors see a succession of images from the past 600 years of Black history. The NMAAHC opened in 2016 using a system of timed entry passes that are both free of charge and in high demand.

The digital museum offers visitors a look at some artifacts previously closed to the public, including a 3D virtual tour of the Point of Pines Slave Cabin in Edisto Island, South Carolina. The cabin is one of two remaining on the island. Both are closed to the public.

This article contains information from National Public Radio. To read the story at www.npr.org click HERE .

Mission And Objectives Of The Jim Crow Museum

The mission of the Jim Crow Museum is to use objects of intolerance to teach tolerance and promote social justice.

The Museum’s mission is achieved through the following objectives:

  • Collect, exhibit and preserve objects and collections related to racial segregation, anti-black caricatures, civil rights, and African American achievement.
  • Promote the scholarly examination of historical and contemporary expressions of racism.
  • Serve as a teaching resource for Ferris State University courses which deal, directly or indirectly, with the issues of race and ethnicity.
  • Serve as an educational resource for scholars and teachers at the state, national and international levels.
  • Promote racial understanding and healing.
  • Serve as a resource for civil rights and human rights organizations.

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How Did People Become Revolutionaries

The rumblings of the American Revolution began more than a decade before the shot heard round the world ignited Americas War for Independence. Discover through seven galleries how the American Colonistsmost of them content and even proud British subjectsbecame Revolutionaries as the roots of rebellion took hold.

Learn how the words of the Declaration of Independence immediately helped fuel the aspirations for personal liberty of ordinary Americans. Explore the story of Elizabeth Freeman, an enslaved woman who sued for her freedom on the basis that she was entitled to natural rights. Explore what the Declarations promise of equality meant for all people, including women, enslaved people, and laboring men.

National Museum Of African American History & Culture Virtual Tour

National Museum of African American History and Culture ...

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is one of the many Smithsonian Institute museums located in Washington, DC. Nearly 5 million people have visited the NMAAHC since it opened in September 2016, which makes it one of the most popular museums in DC. So, now is a great time to check out the museum virtually.

There are a number of collections available for viewing on the museums website. The site also features a Learning Lab for children ages 0-8, which could be a great addition to your distance learning curriculum. The NMAAHC is one of a number of African American History museums you can explore from home.

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Sarah T

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It's now possible to visit the Smithsonian's African American history museum virtually

Elliot C. Williams

virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

The NMAAHC launched a "Searchable Museum" this week, translating its archives and stories into an interactive digital experience. Alan Karchmer/Courtesy of the Smithsonian hide caption

Anyone who's been to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture will speak of its elevator ride through time, which takes visitors from the present day to the 15th century and kicks off the first exhibit, Slavery & Freedom . With the launch of a new virtual platform, visitors can now travel on the elevator down to that exhibit without ever leaving their homes.

The Searchable Museum , launched Thursday, transforms the artifacts, stories, and interactive experiences of the physical exhibit into a digital platform where museumgoers can take it in at their own pace.

Eventually, the museum plans to bring all of its exhibits online. The next exhibit, Making a Way Out of No Way , will go online this spring.

"History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived — but if faced with courage, need not be lived again, " echoes Angelou's voice as a video plays, showing images from the past 600 years of Black history.

While nothing quite matches seeing or touching certain artifacts in person, the digital museum will provide an inside look into some previously off-limits areas. Visitors can, for the first time, go inside the Point of Pines Slave Cabin, one of two remaining slave cabins on Edisto Island, South Carolina, with a 3-D virtual tour.

Unlike other Smithsonian museums, the NMAAHC has required timed-entry passes to enter the site almost exclusively since it opened in 2016. Though these timed tickets are still free of charge, they can be snapped up pretty quickly: Many tickets for December have already been claimed. (During the pandemic, plenty of Smithsonians have followed suit, requiring timed entry passes to avoid overcrowding.)

The virtual project has new elements, like videos, podcasts, and behind-the-scenes looks at the research behind the exhibits. One section, called " Lesser-Known Stories ," captures stories that have been largely ignored throughout history — like the story of Nathan "Nearest" Green , the first known Black master distiller, who taught Jack Daniel how to make Tennessee whiskey; or the story of the largest known mass suicide of enslaved people, an act of resistance at Igbo Landing.

"This ongoing project provides a chance for Americans to realize our shared past, bringing the unique museum experience to their homes and on their phones," Kevin Young, the museum's director said in a press release. "Allowing the public to virtually revisit the originating struggle for American freedom in the 'Slavery and Freedom' exhibition reminds us of the centrality of the African American journey to the American experience—a story of triumph, resilience and joy over the centuries."

The site will also include links to related content elsewhere online, like a time-lapsed video of more than 31,000 slave ships during the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, between 1514 and 1860.

"This is just the start," Young told The Washington Post . "We're looking right now at phase two and stories we can tell next."

This story is from DCist.com , the local news site of WAMU.

© 2024 WAMU

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WAMU values your feedback.

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clock This article was published more than  2 years ago

Smithsonian African American museum launches online interactive access

The new ‘searchable museum’ will bring a trove of artifacts, stories and images to the internet.

virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture launched a sophisticated digital platform Thursday that brings a trove of interactive stories, images and video about the Black experience out of the museum and onto the Internet.

Called the Searchable Museum , it is designed to present the treasures of the five-year-old landmark on the National Mall in Washington to a broader audience, said museum director Kevin Young. The museum, which opened to the public on Sept. 24, 2016, has 40,000 artifacts.

“I used to talk about the digital future, but it’s really the digital present,” Young said. “We’re bringing the museum beyond its four walls. … It’s like a museum in your pocket.”

“The goal was really to think about how we could bring history in your hands,” he said Wednesday. “I really think the experience of going to the museum … is transformative. And … what we wanted out of the site is something transformative as well.”

Young said the digital access will allow the public to view exhibits at their own pace and in their own time. “I really see it as an incredible resource for visitors … who really want to either experience the museum for the first time or return again and again online,” he said.

“And there’s things you can see [virtually] that you can’t see in person,” he said.

For example, a meticulously preserved slave cabin from Edisto Island, S.C., is on display in the museum. “What you can’t do in the museum is go inside it,” Young said. But now you can, digitally.

The visitor can also take a grim 3-D virtual tour of the slave ship L’Aurore, for which a complete set of building plans survives.

Haunting relics from a slave ship headed for African American museum

In 1784, the ship, specifically designed to transport enslaved people, carried 600 captives from West Africa to what is now Haiti to work on sugar and coffee plantations, according to the museum.

There’s also a time-lapse video showing the movement of 31,042 slave ships that carried millions of captive people from Africa to Europe, the Caribbean, and North and South America between 1514 and 1860.

Also, a chilling video depicts the toll the sea voyage took on the enslaved. Tens of thousands perished on the journey.

In 1704, the French slave ship Badine , sailing out of La Rochelle, took on 700 captives in Whydah, in modern-day Benin.

When the ship arrived at the slave port of Cartagena, now in Colombia, only 14 of the captives had survived.

“Every morning, perhaps more instances than one are found of the living and the dead … fastened together,” recalled John Newton, an English slave ship captain who later became an abolitionist and wrote the words to “Amazing Grace.”

The cruelty was unimaginable. The enslaved were beaten, branded and kept shackled. One image shows an English slave trader tasting an enslaved man’s sweat to detect disease.

Another story is told of a group of captured Africans, members of the Ibo people, who in 1803 overpowered the crew of their slave ship, and then, still chained together, drowned themselves at a place in southeast Georgia now called Ibo Landing.

Digital visitors can see the shawl given by Britain’s Queen Victoria to the famous underground railroad conductor Harriet Tubman, as well as a simple straw hat owned by the civil rights and bus boycott leader Rosa Parks.

Harriet Tubman’s lost Maryland home found, archaeologist say

There is a pocket version of the Emancipation Proclamation carried during the Civil War by Union soldiers to inform the enslaved in rebel states that they were free, and a striking photo of an African American laundress.

She wears an American flag attached to her dress and is believed to have worked for soldiers in the Union Army.

Another image shows Queen Nzingha, who in the 1600s ruled the Mbundu people in the state of Ndongo, located in Kongo, the exhibition says.

Ayuba Suleiman Diallo was an educated Muslim slave trader who was captured in 1731 and enslaved on a tobacco plantation in Annapolis. He was eventually freed, returned to Gambia, and ransomed fellow Muslims who were enslaved.

The exhibition is “searchable within the museum but also searchable expanding across the Smithsonian and further out,” said Mary Elliott, the curator of the museum’s first digital exhibition, called “Slavery and Freedom.”

Other stories abound — like that of Ellen and William Craft , whose escape from slavery involved a daring racial and gender masquerade.

Ellen Craft, a light-skinned enslaved woman, disguised herself as a frail White man who was traveling with his servant, portrayed by Craft’s dark-skinned enslaved husband, William.

In December 1848, in Macon, Ga., the couple planned to cross hundreds of miles of hostile, slaveholding country to reach the safety of Philadelphia. (Slavery had been outlawed in Pennsylvania the year before.)

But they knew that a White woman would not customarily travel with an enslaved male servant. So Ellen had to become a man.

William cut his wife’s hair short. She put on a top hat, and pretended she was deaf. She bandaged her face to hide the absence of a beard, and put her arm in a sling, so she wouldn’t have to sign anything. Neither Ellen nor William could then read or write.

“When the time had arrived for us to start, we blew out the lights, knelt down and prayed to our Heavenly Father mercifully to assist us as he did his people of old to escape from cruel bondage,” the couple wrote in a book years later.

“I took my wife by the hand, stepped softly to the door … [and] whispered …‘Come my dear. Let us make a desperate leap for liberty,’ ” William said, in their account.

With hair-raising close calls, they traveled to Richmond, Washington and Baltimore and reached Philadelphia and freedom on Christmas Day, 1848.

“That’s one of those stories that should be better known,” Young said. “It’s a powerful story. … It also thinks about race, gender and class.”

“People now, for many reasons, are talking about ‘passing,’ ” for White, he said. “And that story talks about that.”

The project, more than a year in the making, has been made possible through the support of Bloomberg Philanthropies, the museum said.

Other digital exhibitions are planned after “Slavery and Freedom.”

“This is just the start,” Young said. “We’re looking right now at phase two and stories we can tell next.”

“This is African American history, which is central to American history,” he said. “To understand American history, we have to understand this. We have to understand the impact of slavery on life today. This is true for everyone.”

The exhibition opens with words from the late African American poet Maya Angelou: “History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived; but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.”

Joy of Museums Virtual Tours

Virtual tours of museums, art galleries, and historic sites, national museum of african american history and culture – virtual tour.

National Museum of African American History and Culture - Joy of Museums - External

National Museum of African American History and Culture – Virtual Tour

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a Smithsonian Institution Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

It has over 35,000 objects in its collection related to African American History and Culture and is open to the public free of charge.

The museum was established in 2003, and it opened in 2016, in a ceremony led by U.S. President Barack Obama.

Its collection relates to African American subjects of community, family, the visual and performing arts, religion, civil rights, slavery, and segregation.

The museum has separate 12 exhibition areas with multiple interactive activities and videos across five floors.

A Tour of the National Museum of African American History and Culture

Great negro mart.

National Museum of African American History and Culture - Joy of Museums - Manillas

These Manillas were a form of money, made of bronze or copper, which were used in West Africa. Manillas became the principal money of the slave trade and were used as trade goods in the Atlantic slave trade.

The trade involved taking manillas and other brass objects such as pans and basins to West Africa, to buy slaves for delivery to America and then returning to Europe with cotton for the mills of Europe.

The price of a slave, expressed in manillas, varied according to place, and the specific type of manilla offered.

Manillas were produced in large numbers in a range of designs, sizes, and weights. Originating before the colonial period, as the result of trade with the early Portuguese Empire. 

Manillas during the slave-trading period became the general-purpose currency in West Africa, being used for everyday commercial transactions, payment of fines, and compensation.

Manillas were often hung over a grave to show the wealth of the deceased.

As the slave trade was eliminated in the 19th century, manilla production declined and became unprofitable. Many manillas were melted down by African craftsmen to produce artworks.

Manillas continued to serve as money and decorative objects until the late 1940s.

  • Name:                Manillas
  • Material:           Bronze or copper
  • Use:                    A form of money in the Slave Trade
  • Museum:           National Museum of African American History and Culture

“Great Negro Mart”

National Museum of African American History and Culture - Joy of Museums - "Great Negro Mart"

This object is a card for the “Great Negro Mart,” used by Byrd Hill as his calling card. Byrd Hill owned and operated a large slave yard where a “general assortment of negroes” was available for purchase.

 The slave trade made significant profits for slave dealers, sales patrols, auctioneers, law officials, and others who contributed to the trafficking in humans.

Although slavery is no longer legal anywhere in the world, human trafficking remains an international problem to this day and an estimated that tens of million people are enslaved today.

  • Name:           Great Negro Mart
  • Use:               Calling card promoting a slave yard
  • Museum:        National Museum of African American History and Culture

National Museum of African American History and Culture - Joy of Museums - Code Noir

The Code Noir (French: Black Code) was a decree passed by France’s King Louis XIV in 1685, that defined the conditions of slavery in the French colonial empire.  

The code detailed the “acceptable” conditions for enslavement. It legitimized slave ownership and, at the same time, allowed slaves certain rights.

The Code Noir also restricted the activities of free Negroes, forbade the exercise of any religion other than Roman Catholicism, and ordered all Jews out of France’s colonies.

The Code Noir has 60 articles, below is a sample of some the articles:

  • Slaves must be baptized in the Roman Catholic Church
  • Public exercise of any religion other than Roman Catholicism was prohibited
  • Jews could not reside in the French colonies
  • Slaves must not carry weapons except under permission of their masters for hunting purposes
  • Slaves belonging to different masters must not gather at any time under any circumstance
  • Masters must give food and clothes to their slaves, even to those who were sick or old
  • A slave who struck his or her master, his wife, mistress or children would be executed
  • A slave husband and wife and their prepubescent children under the same master were not to be sold separately
  • Fugitive slaves absent for a month should have their ears cut off and be branded.
  • For another month, their hamstring would be cut, and they would be branded again. A third time they would be executed
  • Slave masters 20 years of age may free their slaves
  • Freed slaves were French subjects, even if born elsewhere
  • Freed slaves had the same rights as French colonial subjects

The Code Noir resulted in a far higher percentage of blacks being free people of color compared to non-French colonies.

They were, on average, more literate, with a significant number of them owning businesses, properties, and even slaves.

  • Name:         Code Noir
  • Date:           1687
  • Use:             Royal decree defining the conditions of slavery in the French Colonies.
  • Museum:      National Museum of African American History and Culture
  • National Museum of African American History and Culture
  • Name:            The National Museum of African American History and Culture
  • City:                Washington, D.C.
  • Country:        United States
  • Opened:        2016
  • Type:             History and Culture Museum

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture Tour

Smithsonian Institution National Museum of African American History and Culture

African American topics covered by the Museum

  • Segregation
  • Civil Rights
  • Religious Groups
  • American South
  • American West
  • Clothing and Dress
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Museum, relics, and treasures reveal U.S. history through an African-American lens

African American Museum

Visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture

  • The Museum requires timed-entry passes for certain peak times and busy seasons when visitor demand is highest. During off-peak times, when visitor numbers are lower, visitors can enter the Museum without a timed-entry pass.
  • Entry to all Smithsonian museums in Washington, D.C., is free.
  • The Museum is located at 1400 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, D.C., between Madison Drive and Constitution Avenue and between 14th and 15th Streets.
  • The Museum is open 7-days a week, 364 days a year. Regular operating hours are from 10:00 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. The Museum is closed on December 25.
  • Peak Season is usually from March to August.
  • All visitors are required to pass through security screening at the entrance to the Museum. All visitors are expected to walk through a metal detector. Those visitors unable to go through the metal detector will be hand-screened with an electronic wand.
  • No food and drink are allowed in the Museum. Bottled water is permitted. Food and beverages may be consumed in the Museum Café.

First African American history museum in the US

Explore Museums in Washington, D.C.

  • National Gallery of Art
  • National Museum of American History
  • National Air and Space Museum
  • National Museum of Natural History
  • National Portrait Gallery
  • Smithsonian American Art Museum
  • The Phillips Collection
  • Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden
  • International Spy Museum

Visit African American History Museum

The National Museum of African American History and Culture

Virtual Tour of National Museums of the United States

  • National Museum of the United States Air Force
  • National Museum of the Marine Corps
  • National Veterans Memorial and Museum
  • National Nordic Museum
  • National Museum of the United States Navy
  • National Constitution Center
  • The National WWII Museum
  • National World War I Museum and Memorial
  • National Civil War Museum
  • National Civil Rights Museum

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Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture Washington, United States

The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a museum that seeks to understand American history through the lens of the African American experience. The only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture, it was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades of efforts to promote and highlight the contributions of African Americans. The Museum opened to the public on September 24, 2016, as the 19th museum of the Smithsonian Institution. The Museum is a public institution open to all, where anyone is welcome to participate, collaborate, and learn more about African American history and culture. In the words of Lonnie G. Bunch III, founding director of the Museum, “there are few things as powerful and as important as a people, as a nation that is steeped in its history.”

A Look at the Black Fashion Museum Collection and Designer Peter Davy

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12 Black History Museums You Can Explore from Home

Black History Museums You Can Explore From Home

Looking for Black History Museums you can explore from home?  The Black experience is so vast and varied that there’s no end to what can be learned about it.  This is why when I travel, I visit local African-American History Museums to get a better feel for a new destination. On a trip to Georgia, my family and I visited the Jack Hadley Black History Museum and learned first-hand what it was like for the museum’s curator, Mr. Hadley, to grow up on a plantation.

But you don’t have to travel to explore some of the best exhibits in the country.  Thanks to technology, you can visit some of them virtually . If you’re interested in learning more about African American history and culture in the United States, there’s a bevy of museums and resources available online.

Google Arts & Culture and the United States Civil Rights Trail provide virtual tours, exhibits, and access to online archives that you can explore from home.

Here are some African American History and Civil Rights Museums that you can explore from home:

12 AFRICAN AMERICAN BLACK HISTORY MUSEUMS TO VISIT VIRTUALLY

12 Black History Museums to visit virtually featured by top BIPOC blogger, Momma Wanderlust

National Museum of African American History & Culture Courtesy: bakdc/ Shutterstock

You can find a complete list of all the virtual tours offered by Google Arts & Culture here .

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington, DC)

Since opening in 2016, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture has become one of the most popular museums in Washington, DC. Visitors are educated about the Black experience by going on a trip through time. The journey starts in Africa with its history galleries that span from Slavery to Emancipation and then from Segregation to Today.  More than 3,500 exhibits are available online.

Archives of African American Music & Culture (Bloomington, Indiana)

The collections in the Archives of African American Music & Culture museum highlight African American music ranging from classical, and religious, to popular music including R&B and Hip Hop.

The Museum of African American Art (Los Angeles, California)

The Museum of African American Art interprets, promotes, and preserves art by or about people of African descent. It was founded in 1976 to increase public awareness of African American Art.

The Gordon Parks Foundation (Pleasantville, New York)

You can take a trip through time with the life work of famed African American photographer, Gordon Parks. The Gordon Parks Foundation showcases Parks’s career, which spans from the 1940s up until his death in 2006. Parks’ photographs focused on race relations, Civil Rights, and urban life.

Dance Theater of Harlem (New York, New York)

The Dance Theater of Harlem is the first Black classical ballet company and the first major ballet company to prioritize Black dancers. This school was founded more than 50 years ago. There are four online exhibits about the history of this world-famous dance company as well as some amazing photos of the company over the years.

Negro Leagues Baseball Museum ( Kansas City, Missouri )

Watch a short film that provides an introduction to the Negro League Baseball League through the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum virtual tour. The film includes interviews with former Negro League players.

Frederick Douglass National Historic Site ( Washington, DC )

While many of the museums in Washington, DC have re-opened Cedar Hill, Frederick Douglass’s Historic home is still closed.  If you would like to learn more about Douglass, an ambassador, abolitionist, writer, and former slave you can explore his home virtually.  He purchased this stunning 21-room Victorian mansion in 1878. There are a number of rooms filled with artifacts that are viewable in the online tour.

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) – University Libraries [Online Exhibit: African Americans at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1892-1971] (Greensboro, NC)

The UNCG’s online exhibit offers a riveting look inside the lives of some African American employees who worked on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. This exhibit features not only photos of the Black workers in the late 1800s but there are artifacts listing how much the University paid some of its African American employees.

The Black Archives of Mid-America (Kansas City, Missouri)

The Black Archives of Mid-America offers two online exhibits: one about famous dancer Alvin Ailey; and the other about the Historic 18 th and Vine Jazz District in Kansas City.

The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center) (Atlanta, Georgia)

The King Center is part of the memorial and childhood home of Dr. King. This online exhibit contains various letters and miscellaneous documents and artifacts.

DuSable Museum of African American History (Chicago, Illinois)

Created in 1961, the DuSable Museum of African American History is one of the oldest museums of African American history. Originally started as the Ebony Museum of Negro History and Art, this institute was the largest caretaker of African American culture until the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture opened.

 Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site at Moton Field (Tuskegee, Alabama)

Take a virtual tour of the primary flight-training site for the Tuskeegee Airmen , the famed African American pilots of World War II.

SIX CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUMS TO VISIT VIRTUALLY

12 Black History Museums to visit virtually featured by top BIPOC blogger, Momma Wanderlust

You can find a complete list of all the virtual tours and experiences offered by the United States Civil Rights Trail here .

  • National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel ( Memphis, Tennessee ) The National Civil Rights Museum was built around the Lorraine Motel, the location where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in 1968. The museum which traces the Civil Rights Movement in America is filled with some great gems. My favorite exhibits included: a replica of a Montgomery city bus in which Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat for a white passenger and a garbage truck to commemorate the “I Am A Man Sanitation Workers Strike.” This strike, which Dr. King helped organize, was for the improvement of working conditions for Memphis sanitation workers. 
  • National Center for Civil and Human Rights (Atlanta, Georgia) The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is a multicultural center, and it highlights the Civil Rights Movement and the modern human rights movement. The museum has a Voice of the Voiceless gallery, which showcases the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection.
  • International Civil Rights Center & Museum (Greensboro, North Carolina) The International Civil Rights Center & Museum is located in the original Woolworth’s building where the four North Carolina A&T State University students (also known as the Greensboro Four) staged a sit-in to challenge the “Whites Only” lunch counter. This museum commemorates the Greensboro Four’s role in launching the sit-in movement.
  • Martin Luther King Birth Home The Martin Luther King Birth Home is the childhood home of Dr. King.  This museum which is part of the National Park Service, allows you to see where Dr. King spent the first 12 years of his life.
  • Howard University Howard University is a historically Black university located in Washington, DC. The university, which was founded in 1867, is one of the premier Black institutions for higher learning in the country.  Take a 3D virtual tour of the university which is home to several buildings that have been designated as National Historic Landmarks. 
  • Mississippi Civil Rights Museum The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum , which opened in 2017 is dedicated to educating visitors about the Civil Rights Movement.  It also provides more insight into the murders of Emmett Till, a 14-year-old teen that was visiting the state when he was brutally murdered, and Civil Rights Leader, Medgar Evers who was assassinated in front of his Mississippi home.

If you want to learn more about Black History, in addition to virtual tours Black History documentaries also provide some insight into the Black experience in America.  For more Black History inspiration follow us on Instagram .

12 Black History Museums to visit virtually featured by top BIPOC blogger, Momma Wanderlust

National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel

For more articles on Black History in Travel:

  • 10 Best US Cities to Learn About Black History
  • Top 20 Best Black History Museums in the US to Visit
  • 7 Best Sites to Learn about Black History in Washington, DC

If you enjoyed this post on Black History Museums You can Explore from Home, you might find the following family travel articles helpful.

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African American History & Civil Rights Museums – Virtual Tours

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY MUSEUMS

  • Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington, DC) Since opening in 2016, the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture has become one of the most popular museums in Washington, DC. This museum takes visitors on a trip through time starting with the Black Experience in America with its history Galleries that start from Slavery to Emancipation and then from Segregation to Today. There are also exhibits that focus on Black History in popular culture. You can explore more than 3,500 exhibits online.
  • Archives of African American Music & Culture (Bloomington, IN) The collections in the Archives of African American Music & Culture museum highlight African American music ranging from classical, religious, and popular music to include R&B and hip hop.
  • The Museum of African American Art (Los Angeles, CA) The Museum of African American Art interprets, promotes, and preserves art by or about people of African descent. It was founded in 1976 to increase public awareness of African American Art.
  • The Gordon Parks Foundation (Pleasantville, NY) You can take a trip through time with the life work of famed African American photographer, Gordon Parks. The Gordon Parks Foundation showcases Parks’s career, which spans from the 1940s up until his death in 2006, Parks’ photographs focused on race relations, Civil Rights, and urban life.
  • Dance Theater of Harlem (New York, NY) The Dance Theater of Harlem is the first Black classical ballet company and the first major ballet company to prioritize Black dancers. This school was founded more than 50 years ago. There are four online exhibits about the history of this world-famous dance company.
  • Negro Leagues Baseball Museum (Kansas City, MO) You can take a virtual tour of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum and there’s a short movie introduction into the Negro League Baseball that includes interviews with former Negro League players.
  • Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (Washington, DC) Take a virtual tour of Cedar Hill, Frederick Douglass’s Historic home in Washington, DC. Douglass, an abolitionist, orator, writer, and former slave purchased this stunning 21-room Victorian mansion 1878. There are a number of rooms filled with artifacts that are viewable in the online tour.
  • The University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) – University Libraries [Online Exhibit: African Americans at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, 1892-1971] (Greensboro, NC) The UNCG’s online exhibit offers a riveting look inside of the life of some of the African American employees who worked on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. This exhibit features not only photos of the Black workers in the late 1800s but there are artifacts listing how much the University paid some of its Black employees.
  • The Black Archives of Mid-America (Kansas City, MO) The Black Archives of Mid-America there are two online exhibits available for viewing: one about famous dancer Alvin Ailey; and the other about the Historic 18 th and Vine Jazz District in Kansas City.
  • The Martin Luther King, Jr. Center for Nonviolent Social Change (The King Center) (Atlanta, GA) The King Center is part of the memorial and childhood home of Dr. King. This online exhibit contains various letters and miscellaneous documents and artifacts.
  • DuSable Museum of African American History (Chicago, IL) Created in 1961, the DuSable Museum of African American History is one of the oldest museums of African American history. Originally started as the Ebony Museum of Negro History and Art, this museum was the home of the largest caretaker of African American culture until the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.
  •  Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site at Moton Field (Tuskegee, AL) Take a virtual tour of the primary flight-training site for the Tuskeegee Airmen , Black pilots of World War II.
  • U.S. National Archives [Exhibit: Black College Life in the New Deal] (Washington, DC) This online exhibit features fascinating photos of Black Student’s lives on college campuses between January 1, 1933, and December 31, 1941.

CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUMS – You can find a complete list of all of the virtual tours and experiences offered by the United States Civil Rights Trail here .

  • National Civil Rights Museum at the Lorraine Motel The National Civil Rights Museum located in Memphis, TN and serves as not only a memorial but also as a museum. The museum was built around the Lorraine Motel, which was where Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in 1968. The museum traces the Black civil rights movement. It is filled with so many gems to include: a replica of the Montgomery city bus where Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat and a garbage truck to commemorate the “I Am A Man Sanitation Workers Strike,” which is the strike that brought Dr. King to Memphis.
  • National Center for Civil and Human Rights The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is located in downtown Atlanta, Georgia. This museum is a multicultural center and it highlights the Civil Rights Movement and the modern human rights movement. The museum has a Voice of the Voiceless gallery, which showcases the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection.
  • International Civil Rights Center & Museum The International Civil Rights Center & Museum , located in Greensboro, North Carolina in the original Woolworth’s building. This museum’s mission is to commemorate the A&T Four and its role in launching the sit-in movement.
  • Martin Luther King Birth Home As part of the National Park Service, you can visit the Martin Luther King Birth Home and see where Dr. King spent the first 12 years of his life.
  • Howard University Founded in 1867, Howard University is a historically Black university located in Washington, DC. The Founders Library holds the largest collection of African American documents, letters, and oral histories about the Black experience. Several buildings on the campus of this institution have been designated as National Historic Landmarks.
  • Mississippi Civil Rights Museum The Mississippi Civil Rights Museu m, which opened in 2017 covers the entire Civil Rights Movement but it provides more insight into the murders of Emmett Till and Medgar Evers.

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National Museum of Natural History Virtual Tours

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Hall of Fossils - Deep Time, Giant Sloth

The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History virtual tours allow visitors to take self-guided, room-by-room tours of select exhibits and areas within the museum from their desktop or mobile device. Visitors can also access select collections and research areas at our satellite support and research stations as well as past exhibits no longer on display.

Virtual Tour Tips

  • To navigate between adjoining rooms in the tours, click on the blue arrow links on the floor or use the navigation map in the upper right of the presentation screen.
  • Look for the camera icon which gives you a close-up view of a particular object or exhibit panel.
  • Try zooming in as some of the images are stitched together from individual pictures in order to create very high resolution gigapixel images.

Please note: This tour and these presentations have been tested and should work on all common devices, browsers, and operating systems (using a desktop computer with Windows, Mac, Linux or a mobile device such as an iPhone, iPad, or Android). Functionality and appearance may vary as it will adjust automatically to accommodate the most visitors. While the virtual tour has no advertising, ad blocking software or browser settings that block JavaScript and/or XML may interfere with the functionality of the virtual tour. Please let us know what you think of the tour and how the experience can be improved. Send your feedback to the NMNH Web Team .

Site Credit: Imagery and coding by Loren Ybarrondo

Equipment Used: Professional Nikon digital single-lens reflex (DSLR) camera bodies and lenses. The photography is typically done using rectilinear lenses with minimized distortion and shooting equirectangular panoramas at 22K pixels on the long side.

Software Used: No authoring software is used. The tours are hand-coded in HTML5 and JavaScript using the krpano graphics library.

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National museum of african american history and culture presents “god-talk: reimagining faith in the 21st century” film tour.

Movie poster with stylized faces in different colors against blue background.

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is launching a multi-city film screening tour of the documentary film, gOD-Talk: Reimagining Faith in the 21st Century , including panel discussions exploring how and why African American millennials are creating new ways to engage with religion and spirituality. Originally premiering in October 2023, gOD-Talk is the first feature-length film from the NMAAHC. Tour updates, registration details and additional information can be found on the NMAAHC website .

The documentary undertaken by NMAAHC’s Center for the Study of African American Religious Life in association with the Pew Research Center is the culmination project of a five-year study exploring the lives of seven Black millennials—Atheist, Buddhist, Christian, Muslim, Ifa and Spiritualist—and how they reimagine faith in the 21st century. The film was executive produced by Kevin Young, NMAAHC’s Andrew W. Mellon Director. NMAAHC curator Teddy Reeves is the film’s creator and producer along with director and writer, Kim Moir, NMAAHC museum specialist. The film includes narration from Javicia Leslie Walker, film poster design by artist Nikkolas Smith and original music from Grammy winner Fantastic Negrito.

“gOD-Talk is charting new ground in the exploration of Black faith both in the scholarly study of religion and cinematic expression,” Reeves said. “The film gives millennials, the world’s largest living generation, the space to not only wrestle with the complexities of their faith—from issues pertaining to gender and sexuality, abuse and trauma, hip-hop, gentrification and more—but to discuss how they are fearlessly reconstructing their spirituality within or beyond the confines of their traditional upbringings.”

The gOD-Talk film tour and accompanying “talk back” panel discussions will take place at conferences, festivals, museums and community curations around the world. Registration and more details can be found on the NMAAHC website . Discussions will feature principals from the film and leading millennial voices. The film is rated PG-13. 

2024 gOD-Talk Tour Schedule

Jan. 20; 2 p.m.–5 p.m. Winston-Salem, North Carolina Wake Forest School of Divinity, Triad Cultural Arts, Forsyth County Public Library and 1LOVE Festival screening, reception and talk-back

Jan. 26; 4:30 p.m.–9 p.m. Cleveland Case Western University and East Mt. Zion AME Church

Feb. 17; 7 p.m. Cincinnati National Underground Railroad

Feb 18; 6 p.m. Chicago  Samuel Proctor Conference

Feb 27 Tokyo and Osaka, Japan Japan Afro American Friendship Association and Legacy Foundation screenings and book talk: Movements, Motions and Moments

March 6–9 San Jose, California National Council of Black Studies, Stanford University

March 9 Evansville, Indiana Evansville African-American Museum|

March 14 South Orange, New Jersey Walsh Gallery, Seton Hall University

March 15 Honolulu  The Pōpolo Project, Honolulu Museum of Art 

March 27 Hampton, Virginia Hampton University Department of English and Foreign Language and School of Religion 

April 5 and 6 Tulsa, Oklahoma  Phillips Theological Seminary 

April 16 Providence, Rhode Island  Rhode Island Black Heritage and Brown University 

April 17 and 18 Pittsburgh  Heinz History Center sponsored by Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, August Wilson Center, African American History Department at John Hines Center, Urban League and NAACP with book talk: Movement, Motions and Moments.

April 23 Indianapolis  IndyHub, The Exchange at Indianapolis Urban League, and Indy Black Professionals

Film principals include:

  • Candice M. Benbow (Atlanta), multi-genre theologian and writer
  • Rashid Hughes (Upper Marlboro, Maryland), yoga and mindfulness teacher
  • Tre’vell Anderson (Los Angeles), journalist and author
  • Chavonne Taylor (Los Angeles), host and producer
  • Diamond Stylz (Houston), non-profit leader and podcaster
  • Makkah Ali (Chicago), educator
  • Michael Wortham (Brooklyn, New York), educator

About the National Museum of African American History and Culture 

Since opening Sept. 24, 2016, the National Museum of African American History and Culture has welcomed more than 10 million visitors. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu or follow @NMAAHC on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram.  

Melissa Wood

202-297-6161

[email protected]

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Okladnikov Archaeology Museum

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Travel | January 19, 2024

The Most Anticipated Museum Openings of 2024

Scheduled to launch this year are new institutions dedicated to astronomy, Nintendo and women artists

Kunstsilo Nordic Art Museum

Laura Kiniry

Travel Correspondent

Several much-anticipated exhibition openings await Smithsonian Institution visitors this year. A copy of Martin Luther King Jr.’s original “I Have a Dream” speech is now on display at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, while the Smithsonian American Art Museum will see paintings from William H. Johnson’s 1940s Fighters for Freedom series , which includes depictions of famous historical figures such as Harriet Tubman and Mahatma Gandhi as well as lesser-known individuals, all working toward the common goal of world peace. This spring, the National Museum of American History offers visitors an opportunity to engage in hands-on activities that show how inventions improve sports , and to view the very 1966 Honda CB77 “Super Hawk” motorcycle that inspired Robert Pirsig’s fictionalized autobiography Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance , celebrating its 50th anniversary this year. Other highlights include the chance to explore the narrative art of the Plains through everything from historical hides to contemporary ledger sketches at the National Museum of the American Indian; contemplate fiber arts as a means of modern female expression at the Renwick Gallery; or peruse artworks, photographs and archival materials highlighting Brazilian identical twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo (who work under the name OSGEMEOS), and their hip-hop-inspired urban graffiti traditions, at the Hirshhorn Museum.

Around the globe, an array of new museum openings are also poised to enlighten and inspire. Fingers crossed that 2024 is the year that the Grand Egyptian Museum will at long last welcome public visitors, and the open quarry digs and “Hall of Extinction and Hope,” where visitors can explore ways to take action against climate change, at South Jersey’s Edelman Fossil Park Museum are now opening this summer. Whether you’re looking to test your thespian skills on the same stage where the Bard of Avon once stood, delve into LGBTQ+ history through the eyes of a Stonewall pioneer or save a princess from a giant gorilla in “Donkey Kong,” these ten museums will surely bring you into the action and provide a whole new appreciation for what this planet—and its universe—have to offer.

Stonewall National Monument Visitor Center; New York City

Stonewall National Monument Visitor Center

When police raided Manhattan’s Stonewall Inn in the early morning of June 28, 1969—a practice increasingly common at gay bars in that period, under pretexts ranging from “disorderly conduct” to a violation of liquor laws—they set off a series of uprisings that became a huge turning point in the fight for LGBTQ+ rights. President Barack Obama officially designated the site as a national monument in 2016. Now, a visitor center dedicated to sharing the history of the inn—along with its lasting legacy—will be opening next door.

With a grand opening set for June 28, 2024, the Stonewall National Monument Visitor Center will be the first visitor center devoted to the LGBTQ+ rights movement within the National Park Service system. Pride Live is the nonprofit social advocacy group overseeing this inclusive space, curating select works that highlight the history of Stonewall. These include moments specially chosen by Stonewall pioneer and lifelong activist Mark Segal , a founding member of the Gay Liberation Front —an organization that formed in the immediate aftermath of the uprisings to provide a voice for the gay community.

The visitor center will host onsite tours, talks related to the LGBTQ+ community and the ongoing fight for equality, and even musical performances. There will also be two exhibitions that rotate regularly: one featuring up-and-coming LGBTQ+ artists, and another that highlights today’s generation of LGBTQ+ youth and allies and their experience, which is being created in partnership with the Parsons School of Design.

Astronomy Discovery Center at Lowell Observatory; Flagstaff, Arizona

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One of the oldest observatories in the United States is about to get a lot more interactive with the opening of a new science museum. Scheduled to start welcoming visitors in November 2024, the Kemper and Ethel Marley Foundation Astronomy Discovery Center is geared toward everyone from amateur astronomers to people who simply enjoy looking at stars. The new multifaceted space includes a 180-seat immersive theater, which includes a wrap-around LED screen allowing visitors to get up-close views of remote landscapes (like those on Saturn and Mars); a Dark Sky Planetarium that utilizes the skies of Flagstaff for learning about planets and constellations; and two main exhibit halls.

In the Curiosity Zone, kids will have the opportunity to get hands-on with everything from building and launching their own foam rockets to manipulating light beams at an optics table using prisms and mirrors. The Astronomy Gallery, meanwhile, showcases the universe’s big questions—such as “How did we get here?”—and the many angles through which scientists tackle them, including math, art and spirituality. You may find yourself sending encoded messages into space one minute, then tracking real-life meteorites through the use of Lowell astronomer data the next.

The cosmos will be on full display throughout the space, with wall murals detailing astronomical objects like Comet Hale-Bopp and the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and gigantic ceiling-suspended planets, created approximately to scale to give visitors a sense of, say, how small Mercury is in relation to Jupiter.

Nintendo Museum; Kyoto, Japan

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As one of the largest video game companies on the planet, Nintendo is very much a household name. Now, the minds behind such media franchises as “Pokémon” and “Super Mario” are opening an interactive museum to showcase the company’s 135-year history, from its 1889 beginnings as a maker of Japanese-style hanafuda playing cards through its rise as a video game giant. Opening within Kyoto’s former Uji Ogura Plant, which Nintendo once used for manufacturing trading cards and repairing toys and equipment, the space will be brimming with immersive exhibits highlighting some of the company’s most notable games, consoles and video game systems. Walk into the colorful worlds of “Donkey Kong” and “The Legend of Zelda”; test your skills using a Nintendo Switch (a gaming console that can be either hand-held or docked as a home system); and marvel at a Nintendo 64, the world’s first 64-bit home video game system when it launched in 1996 and the working console for 388 cartridge games—85 of which were sold exclusively in Japan.

Although there’s a tight lid on just what the museum will entail, you can expect a family-friendly experience, much like that of the company’s video games (think “ Super Metroid ,” “ Tetris ” and “ Pokémon: Let’s Go, Pikachu! ”).

Museum of Shakespeare; London

A rendering of the 2.3-acre site that will house the Museum of Shakespeare

In 2011, archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) discovered the remains of one of London’s earliest theaters. Little did they know it would eventually become center stage for the city’s newest immersive and interactive museum. This spring, the Museum of Shakespeare opens its doors in the city’s Shoreditch neighborhood and on the site of the former Curtain Theatre, an early-Elizabethan playhouse (and precursor to the Globe) where the great Bard himself put on performances of Romeo and Juliet and Henry V , and even took to the stage in fellow playwright Ben Jonson’s “Every Man in His Humor.” It will also be the first time that the theater ruins are open to the public.

Visitors descend nearly ten feet underground and into a 16th-century day in the life of William Shakespeare, reimagined through innovative multi-sensory technology recreating the sights, sounds and even smells of 1598 London. A projected reconstruction of the playhouse sits right above the remains of the Curtain’s actual stage, and artificial-intelligence technology brings animated performances to life, so you can become a part of the action.

Along with some of the playhouse’s original brick walls and a portion of the sloping gravel surface where the groundlings (the era’s lower-class spectators) once stood to take in a show, several of the site’s excavated finds—including a piece of pottery likely used for stage effects and a broken-bone comb—will be on display.

The 19,000-square-foot museum, which is a collaboration between MOLA, Historic England and creative studio Bompas & Parr, is part of a larger 2.3-acre site that will include apartments, office buildings, shops and restaurants.

Kunstsilo Nordic Art Museum; Kristiansand, Norway

Kunstsilo Nordic Art Museum

This May brings a massive new art museum and cultural center to the southern Norwegian city of Kristiansand. Occupying a meticulously restored 1935 grain silo overlooking the local harbor, Kunstsilo Nordic Art Museum will be home to curated programming that includes concerts and lectures, plenty of expansive views, and (the real kicker!) more than 35,000 square feet of exhibit space dedicated to Nordic modern art.

The museum’s three floors of works come from two main sources: the Southern Norway Art Museum and the Tangen Collection , the largest and most comprehensive private assemblage of Nordic modern art on the planet. The Southern Norway Art Museum brims with over 1,600 arts and crafts from mostly Norwegian artists, including naturalist painter Amaldus Nielsen , known for his local landscapes, and the legendary Edvard Munch (whose iconic painting The Scream is on display in Oslo’s Munch Museum ). The Tangen Collection’s 3,000-plus works include ceramics, photography, paintings, installations and more, over 700 of which will be displayed in Kunstsilo’s inaugural exhibition, “ Passions of the North ,” a journey through Nordic 20th-century art unfolding across 25 rooms.

Interactive digital art and international contemporary exhibitions will also be part of Kunstsilo’s overall programming, and the museum itself intends to serve as an incubator for new ideas.

Hampi Art Labs; Hampi, India

Hampi Art Labs

The southern Indian town of Hampi is a center for traditional arts and crafts, such as Lambani embroidery , an intricate style of needlework that incorporates vivid colors, various stitches and mirrors. This also makes it an ideal base for a new creative space. Opening on February 6, Hampi Art Labs is a showcase for contemporary art-making, connecting artists with the region’s distinct craft traditions and techniques. The center brings together art galleries, exhibit spaces and production facilities in everything from printmaking and ceramics to new media and stone and metal sculpture; the expansive 18-acre space is also home to art studios, residency apartments and a café. Art patrons Sangita Jindal—chairperson of the JSW Foundation , the social development arm of India’s multinational JSW business conglomerate—and her daughter Tarini Jindal Handa are the center’s founders .

A work of art itself, Hampi Art Labs is built from locally sourced materials such as steel and soil that blend seamlessly with the natural landscape. Its opening exhibition, “Right Foot First,” is made up of artworks from the Jindal Collection spanning 1998 to 2023. They include pieces by contemporary Indian artist Shilpa Gupta , who works in everything from manipulated found objects to video art; visual and performance artist Madhavi Gore ; and renowned pop art exponent Andy Warhol .

The Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County’s NHM Commons; Los Angeles

The Most Anticipated Museum Openings of 2024

The largest natural and historical museum in the western United States is about to gain a whole new wing with the addition of NHM Commons , a 75,000-square-foot welcoming portal that will serve as a museum expansion and a community hub. Situated on the southwest side of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County campus in Exposition Park, the new addition—slated to open later in 2024—combines 53,000 square feet of renovated space with 22,000 square feet of new construction, resulting in increased exhibition space for the museum’s vast collection of artifacts and specimens, as well as a new 400-seat multipurpose theater for hosting everything from live theatrical performances to lectures about fossil invertebrates. Two newly formed advisory groups, the NHM Commons Native American Advisory Council and the NHM Commons Advisory Coalition, are also a part of co-curating and developing community engagement within the wing.

NHM Commons’ glass facade provides a smooth transition between indoor and outdoor, and the space includes free-to-access areas such as the Judith Perlstein Welcome Center, where Gnatalie—a colossal, green-hued skeletal mount of a long-neck dinosaur—greets visitors. The wing is also home to Chicana artist Barbara Carrasco’s mural L.A. History: A Mexican Perspective . It portrays the city’s history through 51 vignettes, each of them emphasizing the experience of marginalized groups. For instance, one depicts Japanese American internment during World War II, while another highlights the Zoot Suit Riots of 1943. Each of them is “woven” into the hair of la Reina de los Ángeles , an ode to the city’s original name.

Freedom Monument Sculpture Park; Montgomery, Alabama

The Most Anticipated Museum Openings of 2024

When it opens sometime early this year, Montgomery’s 17-acre Freedom Monument Sculpture Park will tell the story of enslaved Black Americans through a series of large-scale sculptures, on the very same Alabama River where tens of thousands of enslaved people were trafficked via boats and trains. This immersive journey through slavery honors the lives of the 10 million Black people once enslaved across America, and it celebrates their endless resilience, with 48 sculptures by 27 artists, more than half of which are site-specific. These include a new version of L.A.-based Alison Saar’s Treesouls, which features both a male figure and female figure, each rising from a base of tangled roots, and a trio of sculptures by Ghanaian artist Kwame Akoto-Bamfo depicting an enslaved Black family in three different scenarios.

A circular route through woodlands connects the sculptures, along with 18 interspersed artifacts and exhibits detailing the history of slavery. Along with an actual whipping post, the park is home to two original dwellings that enslaved people once occupied.

At the heart of the site stands the 43-foot-tall, more than 150-foot-long National Monument to Freedom, honoring the millions of formerly enslaved Black people emancipated after the Civil War. It’s engraved with the names of more than 100,000 freed Black Americans, all taken directly from the 1870 United States census. This was the first census in U.S. history to include Black people by name alongside the rest of the country’s population.

Female Artists of the Mougins Museum; Mougins, France

Mougins Museum of Classical Art

Last August, longtime art collector Christian Levett closed his Mougins Museum of Classical Art—an antiquities museum in the south of France—with a sole purpose in mind: to convert the space into Europe’s first major museum dedicated entirely to women’s art. When it reopens this June as the Female Artists of the Mougins Museum (Femmes Artistes du Musée de Mougins), visitors can expect a renovated museum of rotating shows of modern and contemporary art by a wide range of female artists, all drawn from Levett’s personal collection. Look for riveting works by American painter and Abstract Expressionist Elaine de Kooning; Britain’s Sahara Longe , known for her paintings of semi-abstract figures set against richly hued backdrops; and multimedia artist Carrie Mae Weems , whose photographic Kitchen Table Series from the 1990s became a voice for Black women.

Grand Egyptian Museum; Cairo

Grand Egyptian Museum

It’s been more than two decades in the making, but 2024 may finally be the year that the Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) opens its doors to the public. Although we’re not making any promises, this colossal project (which we featured as part of our most anticipated museums in 2020 , 2022 and 2023 ) is slated to start welcoming visitors sometime this summer. When it does, it will be the largest archaeological museum complex on the planet—a place overflowing with more than 100,000 artifacts and thousands of years of history, dating from prehistoric times to modern Egypt. From its 2,000-foot-tall translucent stone facade to the colossal statue of Ramses II standing in the complex’s sun-filled atrium entry, GEM makes a strong first impression to visitors.

Roam among thematic gardens; an interactive children’s museum; and a huge collection of antiquities, art and artifacts—a fifth of which will be on public display for the first time ever. Another complex highlight is the Khufu ship , a 20-ton, 4,600-year-old solar barge once owned by the pharaoh Khufu and discovered in 1954 near Egypt’s Great Pyramid.

Still, GEM’s undeniable centerpiece remains its Tutankhamun full treasure collection , featuring approximately 5,000 items found within the young king’s tomb—from a shield adorned in cheetah skin to a pair of sandals worn by the pharaoh himself.

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Laura Kiniry

Laura Kiniry | READ MORE

Laura Kiniry is a San Francisco-based freelance writer specializing in food, drink, and travel. She contributes to a variety of outlets including American Way , O-The Oprah Magazine , BBC.com , and numerous AAA pubs.

Smithsonian Magazine

Twenty-Four Smithsonian Shows to See in 2024

T he new year brings a kaleidoscopic array of exhibitions to the various Smithsonian museums, where recent trends in curation have shows often running longer than before, in some cases for more than a year.

That means some of the most popular museums, such as the National Museum of Natural History, have no new exhibitions to announce this calendar year as they extend current offerings. Similarly, the National Air and Space Museum will wait until the extensive renovations to its downtown Washington facility are fully complete next year to unveil new exhibitions, although, with tickets still required for admission, it’s advisable to plan ahead for the current, highly sought-after offerings.

The Smithsonian’s many other museums along the National Mall and beyond still have a full roster of openings, with curators highlighting major anniversaries, new technologies, thought-provoking artists and the upcoming presidential election.

For the year 2024, here are 24 things to look forward to at the Smithsonian; all museums are located in Washington, D.C. unless otherwise specified.

Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech, National Museum of African American History and Culture

To help celebrate the legacy and life of Martin Luther King Jr., a copy of the civil rights leader’s original “I Have a Dream” speech from the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom returned to public view on January 8. The early draft, written without the iconic phrase that made the speech famous, will be seen along with other items associated with King, including a Congressional Gold Medal issued posthumously in 2014, a 1956 handbill advertising a prayer meeting in Boston and a laundry pail used by King during the 1965 march from Selma to Montgomery. (On view through March 4, 2024)

“Star Power: Photographs From Hollywood’s Golden Age by George Hurrell,” National Portrait Gallery

The go-to photographer for 1930s and ’40s glamour, George Hurrell helped shape how the public saw the world’s top film stars. Even today, decades after the apex of his influence, Hurrell’s photography, which will be highlighted in a new exhibition, defines the era when Hollywood stars became household names. Under contract first by MGM, later by Warner Bros., as well as operating his own studio on Sunset Boulevard, Hurrell captured glossy, dramatically lit shots of Greta Garbo, Spencer Tracy, Clark Gable and Joan Crawford, among others. Norma Shearer reportedly refused to allow herself to be photographed by anyone else, and he’d later help build the career of Rita Hayworth through still portraits alone. (March 1, 2024, through January 5, 2025)

“Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice,” Smithsonian American Art Museum

Born in the Deep South, William H. Johnson emerged as one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century. His influences drew from his education in New York, living in Europe, experiences with modern art and folk art, and time well spent with fellow Black artists during the Harlem Renaissance. In the 1940s, Johnson created his “Fighters for Freedom” series as a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers and performers including Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver and Marian Anderson. The series also featured some international leaders working to bring peace to the world, such as Mahatma Gandhi. This exhibition , which first traveled to five regional art museums across the country, is drawn from the more than 1,000 works by Johnson held in the Smithsonian’s collections. (March 8 through September 8, 2024)

“Change YOUR Game / Cambia TU Juego,” National Museum of American History

A new family-friendly interactive exhibition at the American History Museum’s Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation will show how new technologies and innovations have improved athletic performance in sport over the years, including a Crash Cloud football helmet, cameras developed to automate line calls at professional tennis’ U.S. Open and prosthetics that make extreme sports possible for athletes with amputations. Visitors can become their own problem solvers by creating game-changers for their daily lives through hands-on activities. (March 15, 2024, through TBD)

“Becoming Visible,” Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum

In the three years since Congress passed a law establishing the Smithsonian American Women’s History Museum, the Institution has been doing the hard work of building a museum from the ground up. This herculean effort involves hiring new staff, building a collection, finding a site for the new organization and beginning the educational outreach at the core of every museum’s mission. With a physical structure years away, the museum is launching its first digital exhibition, “Becoming Visible,” this March on its website . The ten-minute experience will highlight the stories of five women whose narratives haven’t been traditionally included in retellings of American history. (Launches March 2024)

“Staging the Supernatural: Ghosts and the Theater in Japanese Prints,” National Museum of Asian Art

Originally set to open just before Halloween last year, this show featuring 60 objects from the museum’s collections was delayed by a last-minute structural emergency. Whether it was caused by spectral beings was never determined, but “Staging the Supernatural” is now set to open in March, with works from the 18th to early 20th centuries exploring how spirits were projected onstage in the vibrant theater traditions of Kabuki and Noh. (March 23 through October 6, 2024)

“Zen and the Open Road,” National Museum of American History

This year marks the 50th anniversary of Robert Pirsig’s unexpected philosophical bestseller Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance , inspired by a real-life father-son road trip from Minneapolis to San Francisco . To celebrate the book and its legacy, the museum will be putting on view the very 1966 Honda CB77 Super Hawk motorcycle that was part of the literary trip. Also in the exhibition are both the manuscript it took Pirsig four years to write and a signed first edition, as well as the author’s typewriter and artifacts from the sailboat he bought with his royalties. (April 15, 2024, through TBD)

“Brilliant Exiles: American Women in Paris, 1900-1939,” National Portrait Gallery

At the start of the 20th century, the City of Light attracted scores of young creatives seeking inspiration in art, literature, design, publishing, music, fashion, theater and dance. What sets this exhibition apart from previous explorations of the movement is that curators have focused on the American women in Paris, from 1900 until the outbreak of World War II. It includes portraits of such leading cultural lights as Josephine Baker, Isadora Duncan, Zelda Fitzgerald, Anaïs Nin, Gertrude Stein and Ethel Waters. (April 26, 2024, through February 23, 2025)

“Suh Do-ho: Public Figures,” National Museum of Asian Art

Last seen locally in 2018, when the Smithsonian American Art Museum showcased his large-scale fabric recreations of his former homes, the South Korean artist Suh Do-ho will return to Washington to help mark the continuing centennial celebrations at the Freer Gallery of Art, which opened in 1923. For this exhibition, Suh will present a new version of his only outdoor public art piece, Public Figures , which stands in a park in New York City. A seemingly empty base for a statue, the piece is held up by hundreds of tiny figures, all working together to lift the pedestal. The first new work installed outside the Freer in more than 30 years, Suh’s sculpture will be on view through 2029. (April 27, 2024, through 2029)

“Unbound: Narrative Art of the Plains,” National Museum of the American Indian

More than 50 contemporary works commissioned by the museum will be juxtaposed with historical hides, muslins and ledger books to offer a full portrait of narrative art among the Native nations of the Great Plains between the 18th and 21st centuries. From 19th-century sketches by Cheyenne artist Bear’s Heart to adaptations of those designs on modern canvases by Martin E. Red Bear (Oglala/Sicangu Lakota) and Lauren Good Day (Arikara/Hidatsa/Blackfeet/Plains Cree), the exhibition —an expanded iteration of a show first held in New York in 2016 — will examine ceremonial events, wars, family life and Native identity. (May 18, 2024, through January 20, 2026)

“OSGEMEOS: Endless Story,” Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

The first U.S. museum survey of art by Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo, identical twins who collaborate under the name OSGEMEOS (Portuguese for “the twins”), “ Endless Story ” will bring together 1,000 artworks, photographs and archival materials reflecting the Brazilian duo’s hip-hop-inspired urban graffiti traditions. In addition to works from the brothers’ childhoods and large-scale paintings on wood and canvas, the show will include The Moon Room , a 2022 installation featuring sound, special architecture and custom wallpaper. (May 18, 2024, through July 6, 2025)

“Subversive, Skilled, Sublime: Fiber Art by Women,” Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum

A new exhibition at the Smithsonian gallery dedicated to contemporary craft and decorative art will make the case for fiber as an ideal medium for 20th-century women. Thirty-four selected artworks in cloth, thread and yarn reflect their creators’ personal experiences and ingenuity. Among the featured artists are Kay Sekimachi , who creates three-dimensional woven sculptures, boxes and bowls; Lia Cook , who uses the electronic Jacquard loom to create pieces in electrifying colors; and Consuelo J. Underwood , whose colorful pieces reference contemporary immigration, human rights and border politics. (May 31, 2024, through January 5, 2025)

“Bruce Onobrakpeya: The Mask and the Cross,” National Museum of African Art

The influential 91-year-old Nigerian printmaker, painter and sculptor held his first major U.S. exhibition at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art last year. Soon to be on view in Washington, the show concentrates on the years 1967 to 1978, when Onobrakpeya created works that combined Nigerian traditions, folklore and cosmology with motifs from the Bible and Christianity, beginning with a series commissioned by the Catholic Church, titled Fourteen Stations of the Cross . The exhibition is rounded out with other examples from the artist’s six-decade career. (Mid-June 2024 through January 2025)

“Forensic Science on Trial,” National Museum of American History

Forensic science goes back a lot further than the “CSI” television franchise. A new exhibition in the American History Museum’s Albert H. Small Documents Gallery will trace the discipline’s roots to 1872, when Connecticut woman Lydia Sherman went on trial for poisoning three of her husbands and eight children in her care. The show will include a courtroom display of arsenic tests from Sherman’s trial, the first lie detector device and a vial of scopolamine marketed by early 20th-century doctor Robert House as “truth serum.” (June 2024 through June 2025)

“This Morning, This Evening, So Soon: James Baldwin and the Voices of Queer Resistance,” National Portrait Gallery

Named after a story by Baldwin, this exhibition—guest curated by Hilton Als , a Pulitzer Prize-winning critic for the New Yorker— will explore the intersections between the acclaimed American writer and other Black civil rights icons who had to hide their sexuality, from organizer Bayard Rustin to playwright Lorraine Hansberry . Also represented are poet Essex Hemphill, filmmaker Marlon Riggs and former U.S. Representative Barbara Jordan. Portraits by such artists as Richard Avedon, Glenn Ligon, Faith Ringgold and Lorna Simpson will appear. (June 7, 2024, through April 27, 2025)

“Picturing the Presidents: Daguerreotypes and Ambrotypes from the National Portrait Gallery’s Collection,” National Portrait Gallery

To mark another presidential election year, the National Portrait Gallery will display an array of images of eight men who held the nation’s highest office during the heyday of the 19th-century photographic processes of daguerreotype and ambrotype —from the sixth president, John Quincy Adams, to the 21st, Chester A. Arthur. The show includes a rare ambrotype pin from Abraham Lincoln’s first presidential campaign in 1860. A few presidents outside of that era are even represented, with daguerreotypes of paintings depicting George Washington and Andrew Jackson on one end and a daguerreotype of the 2009 inauguration of Barack Obama at the more recent end. (June 21, 2024, through June 8, 2025)

“Stanley: Toward a New Kind of War,” National Museum of American History

Not to be confused with the steam-powered car of the same name that debuted a century earlier, the Stanley was a self-driving robot vehicle created by a team from Stanford University and Volkswagen in 2004. The following year, it won an off-road, driverless car competition held by the Department of Defense to assess the feasibility of reducing American military casualties by sending out robots in place of soldiers. The blue Volkswagen Touareg also helped revolutionize the driverless car technology that’s slowly appearing on city streets. This year, come meet the original model. (July 2024 through Fall/Winter 2026)

“Shifting Boundaries: Perspectives on American Landscapes,” National Museum of Asian Art

The oldest art museum on the National Mall, turning 101 this year, has usually interpreted works in its American galleries by James McNeill Whistler, Thomas Dewing and Abbott Thayer based on the taste and perspectives of its founding donor, Charles Lang Freer . In this new exhibition, the paintings will be interpreted by a variety of invited voices who had previously been underrepresented. That means new approaches to works by Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent and Willard Metcalf that reflect human relationships with the natural world. (July 13, 2024, through TBD)

“Voting by Mail,” National Postal Museum

The presidential election year is the perfect time to reflect on past examples of national voting by mail. An exhibition to this effect is in the works at the National Postal Museum, which already includes in its collection a mailed tally sheet from 1864 recording the votes of soldiers from Highland County, Ohio; an absentee ballot request postcard for an Alabama soldier during World War II ; a 5-cent postage stamp reminding citizens to register and vote; and a complete absentee ballot kit and instruction sheet from the last presidential election in 2020. (August 2024 to TBD)

“Sublime Light: Tapestry Art of D.Y. Begay,” National Museum of the American Indian

A fourth-generation weaver who sold her first rug at age 12, the Diné artist D.Y. Begay incorporates colors derived from plants from the Navajo Nation into her works in order to reflect the colors of the vistas and masks of her reservation. She describes her craft as “painting with yarn.” “Sublime Light,” the first retrospective in her career, showcases 48 of her tapestries from more than three decades of work. (September 19, 2024, through TBD)

“An Epic of Kings: The Great Mongol Shahnama,” National Museum of Asian Art

Produced in 1335 by the Mongol rulers of Iran, the Ilkhanids, the Persian national epic known as the Great Mongol Shahnama, or Firdawsi’s Book of Kings, was celebrated for its boldly conceived, large-scale illustrations. In an upcoming exhibition at the Freer Gallery of Art, more than 20 folios from the manuscript—including nine depicting the story of Alexander the Great—show how the Mongols consciously inserted themselves into the history of Iran. The works will be juxtaposed with pieces from China and the Latin West to hint at the conversations happening globally in the 14th century. (August 31, 2024, through January 5, 2025)

“Making Home—Smithsonian Design Triennial,” Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum, New York City

The seventh installment of the Cooper Hewitt’s Design Triennial , established in 2000 to address urgent contemporary issues through design, focuses on the concept of home. Together, a curator from the National Museum of African American History and Culture and curators at Cooper Hewitt, the New York museum in the Andrew Carnegie Mansion on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, stage an exhibition that explores how design affects domestic life in the United States, including its territories and Tribal Nations. (Fall 2024)

“Felix Gonzalez-Torres: Always to Return,” National Portrait Gallery and Archives of American Art

This marks the first major presentation in Washington, D.C. in more than 30 years from Felix Gonzalez-Torres, a Cuban-born American visual artist who redefined portraiture in the 20th century. One of Gonzales-Torres’ best known portraits, the 1991 Untitled (Portrait of Ross in L.A.) consists of 175 pounds of wrapped candy, piled in a corner; it was previously exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery in 2011 on extended loan from the Art Institute of Chicago. The upcoming exhibition will extend outside of the museum, with the artist’s Untitled (America) (1994) , consisting of 12 strings of light, with 42 bulbs in each, stretching from the building’s facade to the first floor of the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library nearby, and then outside along Eight Street between D and E Streets NW, in partnership with the Downtown DC Business Improvement District. (October 18, 2024, through June 22, 2025)

“Pictures of Belonging: Miki Hayakawa, Hisako Hibi and Miné Okubo,” Smithsonian American Art Museum

Three acclaimed American artists of Japanese descent, who had previously been excluded from the country’s story of modernism, are the focus of a new exhibition featuring recent museum acquisitions. Miki Hayakawa, Hisako Hibi and Miné Okubo each had long and innovative careers despite lives that included mass incarceration and relocation as Japanese Americans during World War II. All three women were at the Topaz War Relocation Center in Delta, Utah, which held 9,000 prisoners from 1942 to 1945. Works by Hibi and Okubo were recently acquired by the Smithsonian American Art Museum as part of an initiative to expand and enrich representation of Asian American artists and perspectives. (November 15, 2024, through August 17, 2025)

For the year 2024, here are 24 things to look forward to at the Smithsonian.

Small Group Uzbekistan Tours 2024-2025

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  • Khabarovsk and Vladivostok Tour

7-day Khabarovsk and Vladivostok Tour 7 Days | Khabarovsk, Vladivostok

Vladivostok

Visit the two largest cities in Russia’s remote Far East region - Khabarovsk, on the Russian-Chinese border, and the legendary Vladivostok, terminus of the Trans-Siberian Railway. With a mix of nature, military and political history, indigenous culture, and gastronomy, this Vibrant Cities of the Russian Far East Tour showcases many diverse highlights of this unique part of Russia. From your base in Khabarovsk, venture into the surrounding area to visit an indigenous Nanai village, see Neolithic petroglyphs, and take a guided walk through the Bolshekhekhtsirsky Nature Reserve. Moving to Vladivostok, discover the city’s rich military history, beautiful coastal landscapes, and delicious seafood. Highlights include visiting famous forts; seeing lighthouses, bridges, and more on an evening boat tour; and visiting a sea cucumber farm to learn how this delicacy is harvested.

Tour itinerary:

During your free time, we offer the following optional activities (at additional cost): Boat trip on the Amur River; Trip on the Khabarovsk Embankment’s ferris wheel.

During your free time, we offer the following optional activities (at additional cost): Visit to the Fishes of Amur River Museum; Visit to the Museum of the History of Khabarovsk.

During your free time, we offer the following optional activities (at additional cost): Visit to the Museum of the City.

During your free time, we offer the following optional activities (at additional cost): Visit to the Primorsky Oceanarium; Evening tour that includes visits to the city’s viewing platforms.

During your free time, we offer the following optional activities (at additional cost): Visit to the Military History Museum of the Pacific Fleet; Visit to the Seaside Safari Park.

Recommendations: Bring comfortable waterproof clothing and shoes for hiking, a windproof jacket, a raincoat, and mosquito repellent.

  • All transfers (1-2 pax by sedan type car, 3-7 pax by minivan, 8-13 pax by 30 seat bus, 14+ pax by 40-50 seat bus);
  • Accommodation based on double/twin room sharing, breakfasts included;
  • Lunch on Day 2;
  • Sightseeing tour programme with local, English-speaking, guides;
  • Entrance tickets to sights as per itinerary;
  • Train ticket Khabarovsk – Vladivostok;
  • Visa support for Russia tourist visa;
  • In groups of 11 or more travellers, 1 person travels free of charge and is accommodated in a single room.
  • Tour leader to accompany the travellers for the whole tour;
  • Full board (lunches and dinners, unless otherwise stated);
  • Hotel charges for additional services;
  • Consular fees for Russia tourist visa;
  • Tips/gratuities for drivers and guides (although these would be appreciated);
  • International flight tickets before and after the tour;
  • Personal travel insurance.

Accommodation

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Moscow and Yekaterinburg Tour

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Morning at the Museum

  • Saturday, February 3, 2024
  • 8:00am - 10:00am
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About This Event

Please join us for the Smithsonian’s Sensory Friendly Morning at the Museum program at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Saturday, February 3rd, 2024 from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. 

Pre-registered families will be able to explore the entire museum (including the new Afrofuturism exhibition!) before it opens to the public.

Pre-visit materials will be sent to registered families prior to the program. Due to high demand, we kindly ask that you only reserve passes for your immediate family (maximum of 8 passes).  

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    virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

  3. Smithsonian Museum Virtual Tours in 2021

    virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

  4. National Museum of African American History and Culture Hosts First

    virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

  5. It's now possible to visit the Smithsonian's African American history

    virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

  6. Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture HD Tour

    virtual tour of smithsonian african american museum

COMMENTS

  1. Explore More!

    An interactive table provides digital access to the museum's growing collection of visual and aural media. CAAMA also operates a media conservation laboratory on the second floor, where members of the public can make appointments to digitize their home movies. Learn More About CAAMA Explore Objects in 3D

  2. National Museum of African American History and Culture

    5 Things to Know Surprising Facts About Martin Luther King Jr. Did you know that Martin Luther King Jr's famous, "I Have a Dream" speech was partially improvised and that the iconic phrase was left out of the original draft? Read Story City of Hope Robert Houston's Photographs of the Poor People's Campaign

  3. African American History Museum Virtual Tour

    ABTs website may not offer the sunshine on your back, but it marries the setting, action and context far more seamlessly, with its 360-degree virtual tours of more than 20 battlefields.

  4. It's now possible to visit the Smithsonian's African American ...

    November 22, 2021 From By Elliot C. Williams The NMAAHC launched a "Searchable Museum" this week, translating its archives and stories into an interactive digital experience. Alan...

  5. National Museum of African American History and Culture Hosts First

    June 19, 2017 News Release The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) celebrated the Juneteenth holiday with its first interactive virtual tour led by the museum's founding director, Lonnie G. Bunch III.

  6. Smithsonian African American museum launches online interactive access

    By Michael E. Ruane November 18, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. EST The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington. (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post) Comment

  7. National Museum of African American History and Culture

    The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a place where all Americans can learn about the richness and diversity of the African American experience, what it means to their lives, and how it helped us shape this nation. Highlights

  8. Plan Your Visit

    Plan Your Visit Plan Your Visit The National Museum of African American History and Culture is open daily to the public. Free timed-entry passes are required for entry. Expand All Hours Free Timed-Entry Passes Safety Measures Touring the Museum

  9. How to Virtually Explore the Smithsonian From Your Living Room

    You can virtually tour the National Museum of Natural History's rotunda, among many other venues. Brendan Smialowski / AFP via Getty Images

  10. National Museum of African American History and Culture

    National Museum of African American History and Culture - Virtual Tour National Museum of African American History and Culture - Virtual Tour The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a Smithsonian Institution Museum on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  11. Celebrate Black History Month With These Free Virtual Events

    The National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, D.C., is hosting a comprehensive exhibition focused on the life of Pauli Murray, a Civil Rights activist who was also the ...

  12. Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

    The National Museum of African American History and Culture is a museum that seeks to understand American history through the lens of the African American experience. The only national museum devoted exclusively to the documentation of African American life, history, and culture, it was established by Act of Congress in 2003, following decades ...

  13. Eight Online Exhibits to See Right Now on Black ...

    For "Chez Baldwin," an online exhibition at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, viewers can become acquainted with the life he made for himself in the ...

  14. 12 Black History Museums to Visit from Home

    12 AFRICAN AMERICAN BLACK HISTORY MUSEUMS TO VISIT VIRTUALLY National Museum of African American History & Culture Courtesy: bakdc/ Shutterstock You can find a complete list of all the virtual tours offered by Google Arts & Culture here. Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (Washington, DC)

  15. Ongoing Tours & Activities

    View event details Big Objects, Big Stories: Plywood panel mural from Resurrection City Thursday, January 25, 2024 1:30pm to 3:45pm Program meets at the Plywood panel mural from Resurrection City, in the A Changing America 1968 and Beyond exhibition., C1. Each 15-min talk takes place at: 1:30 PM, 2:30 PM, and 3:30 PM. Free; walk-in

  16. African American History & Civil Rights Museums

    Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (Washington, DC) Take a virtual tour of Cedar Hill, Frederick Douglass's Historic home in Washington, DC. Douglass, an abolitionist, orator, writer, and former slave purchased this stunning 21-room Victorian mansion 1878.

  17. Virtual Tour

    The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History virtual tours allow visitors to take self-guided, room-by-room tours of select exhibits and areas within the museum from their desktop or mobile device.

  18. Khabarovsk Regional Museum Named After N.I. Grodekov

    Nice museum and good exhibitions: on Amur (flora, fauna, minerals), 70th anniversary of the Patriotic War, pictures of Valerij Shilyaeb "Russian East from Amur to the Pacific Ocean". In the old part of the museum was an exhibition on the native people in the region, natural history and local history (mostly Revolution, Lenin, Stalin).

  19. Digital Resource Guide

    Digital Resource Preserving Family Heirlooms and Treasures Learn how to preserve your family treasures and tell stories about the experiences of your family for generations to come. Download Interactive Story Map The Journey of the Slave Ship São José

  20. National Museum of African American History and Culture Presents "gOD

    The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is launching a multi-city film screening tour of the documentary film, gOD-Talk: Reimagining Faith in the 21st Century, including panel discussions exploring how and why African American millennials are creating new ways to engage with religion and spirituality. Originally premiering in October 2023, gOD-Talk ...

  21. Private Walking tour with a visit to the Khabarovsk Regional Museum

    A walking 5-hour tour is a great opportunity to discover this Russian city and to feel the atmosphere. Khabarovsk is the central city of Khabarovsky kray (region) in the Far East region of Russia. The city is situated 30 km away from the border between Russia and the People's Republic of China. Also Khabarovsk is one of the largest political ...

  22. Okladnikov Archaeology Museum

    Very cheap (100 RUB) activity highly recommended not only for children. Besides, the museum also arranges cultural visits in the Krai. The building itself is a beautiful example of the early 20th century brick architecture of Khabarovsk. This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

  23. The Most Anticipated Museum Openings of 2024

    This spring, the National Museum of American History offers visitors an opportunity to engage in hands-on activities that show how inventions improve sports, and to view the very 1966 Honda CB77 ...

  24. Twenty-Four Smithsonian Shows to See in 2024

    Emma Amos, Winning , 1982, acrylic on linen with hand-woven fabric, 75 × 64 in. (190.5 × 162.6 cm) Smithsonian American Art Museum, Museum purchase made possible by the Catherine Walden Myer ...

  25. The Collection

    The Collection The Smithsonian has launched its Open Access Initiative. Images of objects from the NMAAHC collection are now available to view, download, and share through a CC0 license . Browse Topic Date/Era Object Type Place Search Full Collection Shared Stewardship and Ethical Returns

  26. 7-day Khabarovsk and Vladivostok Tour

    Continue to the picturesque city ponds, the Amur Bridge, and the Khabarovsk Regional Museum named after Grodekov. This museum was created in 1894 on the initiative of the Russian Geographical Society and provides an interesting overview of the archaeology, nature, indigenous peoples, and military and political history of the Khabarovsk territory.

  27. Page couldn't load • Instagram

    189 likes, 0 comments - mcgeheeschool on January 23, 2024: "At McGehee, the junior class trip to Washington, DC is infinitely more than a sightseeing tour. T..." Louise S. McGehee School on Instagram: "At McGehee, the junior class trip to Washington, DC is infinitely more than a sightseeing tour.

  28. Morning at the Museum

    About This Event. Please join us for the Smithsonian's Sensory Friendly Morning at the Museum program at the National Museum of African American History and Culture on Saturday, February 3rd, 2024 from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. Pre-registered families will be able to explore the entire museum (including the new Afrofuturism exhibition!) before ...