neptune cruise ship disaster

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The 1970s Cruise Ship Nightmare That Ended in a Mutiny

By: Robert Klara

Published: June 24, 2019

S.S. America

It was a little after 3:00 a.m. on July 2, 1978 when those aboard the S.S. America realized the voyage was doomed.

Things had gotten off to an uneasy start nine hours before, when some 900 passengers assembled at Manhattan’s West 54th Street pier and found a problem with the tickets. Some paying customers had never received them, while others couldn’t find their names on the manifest. Finally, with the ship running late, a voice barked: “Get on board, tickets or no tickets!”

neptune cruise ship disaster

With crime rates soaring and its economy in the ditch, New York  was a difficult place to live in 1978. Little wonder so many locals in need of a summer escape noticed Venture Cruise Lines’ advertising for the S.S. America , a shopworn ocean liner restored to its prewar elegance. Venture promised no end of onboard pampering, but it was the ticket prices that seduced. Fares for a two-night cruise to nowhere started at $99—a fare so low it was hard to believe.

But now that the voyage was underway, passengers couldn’t believe the predicament they were in. Many discovered that faulty plumbing had flooded their cabins. Beds lacked bedsheets—and often mattresses, too. Toilets refused to flush. While dismayed passengers darted around trying to find a spot to settle, so did a phalanx of cockroaches and rats. S.S. America , one woman later said, was a “floating garbage can.”

Bad as the cabins were, the factor that tipped anger into chaos was this: at least 100 paying passengers never found cabins at all. Homeless at sea, they massed outside the purser’s office and began chanting: “We want to get off!”

Conditions deteriorated quickly. The angriest passengers picked fistfights with the crew. Harbor police boarded the ship. By now the America had dropped anchor near Coney Island, and the captain acceded to the mob’s demands. After the crew opened the hull’s watertight doors, 250 passengers clambered down rope ladders, jumping down to the decks of tugboats pulled up below. The tugs dumped the cruise refugees on Staten Island, then took off. Venture’s promise of chauffeured limousine rides home for everyone came to nothing.

The next morning, tabloids feasted on the overnight debacle. DREAM CRUISE LIKE NAUTICAL NIGHTMARE hollered the front page of the Daily News , which recounted the “mini-mutiny” in sordid detail. Without admitting the company had booked passengers on decks that were uninhabitable, a Venture representative said: “We goofed.”

For New York, a port city that had once berthed the most opulent passenger ships in modern maritime history, no incident would embody the postwar decline of ocean-liner travel like the one that took place aboard the S.S. America on that summer night in 1978. Not only was Venture’s “goof” the work of a company that had no business operating ocean liners, it had unfolded, paradoxically, aboard what had once been New York’s most prestigious one.

When First Lady  Eleanor Roosevelt christened the America on the last day of August in 1939, the 723-foot vessel was the largest, fastest and most luxurious American-built passenger liner afloat. But Hitler’s invasion of Poland on the following day augured a change of course. The Navy appropriated the vessel, renamed it the West Point , and used it as a troop carrier until the end of World War II .

neptune cruise ship disaster

But by 1946, the America was back to steaming from New York to Le Havre in “5 gay days,” quartering a who’s who of celebrities and power brokers in its spacious staterooms and feeding them Roast Philadelphia Capon in its two-story dining salon. For nearly two decades, the America promised “no finer food and service afloat.”

By the mid-1960s, the boat had changed owners and was running from Europe to Australia. As it aged, it became a liability. But for a new concern called Venture Cruise Lines, the prewar ocean liner looked like the perfect opportunity. 

Incorporated by a group of travel-agency executives, Venture paid $5 million for the ship in June of 1978, then threw another $2 million into repairs. Venture’s business plan was to make money on volume, using super-low rates to fill the ship’s hundreds of cabins.

“The $135 all-inclusive price you’re staring at in amazement is not a mirage,” cooed the glossy brochure. “It’s [a] very real, very low-priced cruise being offered as part of Venture Cruise Lines’ fabulous summer and fall program aboard the sensational 2,200-passenger SS America .” Venture promised no end of luxuries for those low rates, including swimming pools, shopping, a casino, nightclub shows, and six meals a day.

But marketing was one thing and nautical engineering another. Though the America ’s infrastructure was in need of serious work, Venture’s refurbishments were, at best, cosmetic. Shortly before the America ’s summer 1978 voyage, the writer and maritime historian Bill Miller slipped aboard at Pier 92. 

neptune cruise ship disaster

Almost immediately, Miller discerned “very serious problems” including rust, leaking pipes and corrosion holes. He found college boys—hired at minimum wage—charged with painting the ship. In the passageways, Miller walked past trash bags, soiled linens and old mattresses. There was also, he’d later write, “a stale stench—a foul mixture of kitchen odors, engine oils, and plumbing backups.” Miller found himself wondering if the America “might best be sent on to the scrappers.”

It would be sent to sea instead.

Though inadequate accommodations had touched off the mutiny of July 2, 1978, the torments that Venture administered to its customers had not stopped with deficient cabins. Promised amenities including the sauna, beauty salon and disco never materialized. The swimming pool was open, in a sense—but the crew had filled it with bags of garbage.

At dinner, one passenger noticed that, instead of washing the china, the staff made do with wiping the dirty plates off with towels. It came as little surprise that the captain’s table was conspicuously missing the captain. “Maybe he was afraid the passengers would make him the main course,” said one passenger.

Incredibly enough, on the heels of its first voyage to hell, Venture managed to repeat the performance a second time. On July 3rd, the New York Post ’s front page announced THAT SHIP IS BACK TO LOAD UP AGAIN, as the America —now dubbed the “mutiny ship”—took on passengers for a 5-day cruise to Nova Scotia. Near Martha’s Vineyard, as heavy seas slammed into the hull, the America ’s portholes began leaking, a water main fractured, and toilets backed up. When the ship finally limped into Halifax, the boarding health inspectors stepped aside for the droves of passengers who were, once again, abandoning ship.

Venture admitted that it “goofed” once more, but promised it would clean up its act and take to sea again. On the next voyage, Venture’s president promised, “you will see a shipful of happy people aboard a great lady named the S.S. America , about to have the time of their lives aboard a tip-top vessel.”

It was not to be. By now, State Attorney General Louis Lefkowitz had caught a whiff of the S.S. America , and confined it to port. (Later, he would charge Venture with “deceptive advertising and business practices.”) When U.S. Public Health Service inspectors boarded the ship, they gave it a sanitary score of 6 out of a possible 100. Cancelled bookings cost Venture close to $400,000. Then the U.S. Customs Service slapped the company with $500,000 in fines—$339,000 of it for having stood by as passengers literally jumped off the ship into tugboats. 

Its assets frozen, facing mounting lawsuits and angry creditors, Venture collapsed. At an auction on August 28, 1978, S.S. America sold for one-fifth what Venture had paid for it.

Perhaps inevitably, the America met an end as tragic as its maligned cruises of 1978. In January of 1994, while being towed to Phuket, Thailand, for conversion to a floating hotel, the ship broke loose of its towing cable south of Gibraltar. After floating free for two days, the abandoned vessel ran aground in the Canaries, where the pounding Atlantic surf snapped it in half.

READ MORE:  The True Stories That Inspired ‘Titanic’ Movie Characters

READ MORE:  One of America’s First Travel Trends Was Dining at George Washington’s Home

neptune cruise ship disaster

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More than 100 Viking cruise passengers get sick in norovirus outbreak

neptune cruise ship disaster

More than 100 Viking passengers became sick during a recent cruise, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said.

The public health agency said 110 of the Viking Neptune ship’s 838 guests reported being ill – more than 13% of all passengers on board – during a sailing that ended Tuesday, as well as 9 out of 455 crew members, according to its website . Their main symptoms were abdominal cramps, vomiting and diarrhea.

The CDC said the causative agent was norovirus. 

Viking did not immediately respond to USA TODAY’s request for comment.

Viking and the ship’s crew took steps such as implementing heightened cleaning and disinfection processes “according to the ship’s outbreak prevention and response plan,” and sharing updates on the number of gastrointestinal illness cases with the CDC Vessel Sanitation Program twice a day, the agency said.

Gastrointestinal illness on cruise ships dropped dramatically during the COVID-19 pandemic, but cases have risen again as the industry has bounced back.

Cruise ship medical facilities What happens if you get sick or injured (or bitten by a monkey)

The CDC has logged 13 outbreaks on cruise ships that met its threshold for public notification so far this year, more than any year between 2017 and 2019. In all other 2023 outbreaks, norovirus was listed as the cause.

Norovirus is often associated with cruises, but Ben Lopman, a professor of epidemiology at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health, told USA TODAY in February that cruises represent a "tiny minority of norovirus outbreaks.” Most happen in health care settings such as nursing homes, he said.

Nathan Diller is a consumer travel reporter for USA TODAY based in Nashville. You can reach him at [email protected].

Watch CBS News

The Neptune: The missiles that struck Russia's flagship, the Moskva

By Ellen Uchimiya, Eleanor Watson

April 16, 2022 / 3:44 PM EDT / CBS News

When the flagship of Russia's Black Sea fleet, the Moskva, was badly damaged earlier this week, Ukraine immediately claimed that it had struck it with two missiles, and Russia denied it, instead blaming the damage on a fire where ammunition on the ship was stored. While the Moskva was being towed to port, it sank, after it became unstable in stormy conditions because of the damage to the hull, the Russian Defense Ministry told the Russian state news service Tass.

On Friday, a senior U.S. defense official confirmed that the Russian cruiser had been struck by two Neptune anti-ship missiles fired by the Ukrainians from land-based launchers. The Ukrainian-made Neptunes may also be launched from ship or air.

The U.S. military's worldwide equipment guide describes the Neptune as an anti-ship cruise missile with a maximum firing range of 280 kilometers, or about 174 miles. The Russian ship, about 600 feet long, was about 60 kilometers or about 37 miles south of Odesa, which is well within the range of the Neptune, a separate defense official said.

According to the second official, the ship generally has almost 500 sailors onboard. Pentagon press secretary John Kirby told CNN Thursday that some crew members were evacuated. "I don't know how many they got off. We did see indications that there were life boats and that some sailors got off the ship," he said. It's not known how many casualties there were.

FILE PHOTO: A Russian missile cruiser

The Neptune has been in service in the Ukrainian Navy since March 2021, according to the U.S. Army.

Military-today.com, a site that tracks military equipment, describes the Neptune as the Ukrainian version of a Russian Kh-35 anti-ship cruise missile, differing in that it is longer and has more fuel and a larger booster. The site says that it was developed by Luch Design Bureau, a Ukrainian defense contractor. Luch Design Bureau's description of the Neptune says, "It is intended to defeat warships such as cruiser, destroyer frigate, corvette, airborne, tank landing ships and vehicles."

Ellen Uchimiya is the Washington executive editor of cbsnews.com and is based in Washington, D.C. She was previously the Washington bureau chief for Bloomberg Television and formerly worked as a producer at Fox News. Location: Washington, D.C.

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The story behind the Neptune missile, the weapon that sank the Moskva

Named for the Roman god of the sea, the Neptune is based on the Kh-35 missile and took years to develop.

By Kelsey D. Atherton | Published Apr 19, 2022 7:00 PM EDT

A US harpoon surface-to-surface missile seen during an exercise in 2019 in the Philippine Sea after being fired from the USS Antietam.

On April 13, two Ukrainian missiles hit the guided missile cruiser Moskva, flagship of Russia’s Black Sea fleet. The vessel sank as it was being towed back to port, bringing to the bottom of the sea Russia’s most capable ship in the region, as well as a religious artifact . While Russia initially reported the damage and sinking as the result of a fire on board the vessel, US defense officials confirmed to NPR that it was Ukrainian missiles that destroyed the ship.

Those missiles were two Neptunes, a Ukrainian design based on an older Soviet anti-ship missile model, but upgraded for modern warfare. Those upgrades appear to have paid off, giving Ukrainian defenders on land the reach and power to destroy a hostile enemy. 

The ability of missiles to destroy ships with existing anti-missile defenses will shape future planning. The US Navy is already investing in anti-missile lasers to protect its own vessels from such attacks, and any navy considering future wars near coasts will have to take into account the possibility of powerful anti-ship missiles in the arsenals of its enemies.

To better understand the threat, it’s important to understand the specific missile.

Meet the Neptune

The Neptune missile is named for the ancient Roman god that was sovereign over the sea. It is based on the Kh-35 missile, a subsonic anti-ship cruise missile the Soviet Union began developing in 1972 . As designed, the Kh-35 missiles would be launched from a special truck on the shore, and then deliver a 330-pound warhead into the side of a ship up to 75 miles away. 

This missile travels at around 671 mph, which is below the speed of sound, and it flies close to the water, especially as it approaches its target, making it much more likely to hit the ship at the water line. To travel towards its target, the Kh-35 uses both inertial guidance, which lets the missile know where it is and where it isn’t , and then an active radar to guide it directly to the part of the ship it is supposed to hit. While the Kh-35 was Soviet in origin, it took until 2003 for it to enter service with the Russian Federation. 

Kyiv’s Luch Design Bureau started developing the Neptune missile in 2013 , with the goal of testing by 2016. In 2014, Russia annexed Crimea and backed separatists forces in the Donbas region of eastern Ukraine, in response to Ukraine’s Euromaidan protests and change of government. That might explain in part why it took until January 30, 2018 for the Neptune to have its first test flight. Later that year, a Neptune hit a target in the ocean 62 miles away . At the time of the later test, Neptune’s range was given at up to 174 miles, though a brochure for Luch Design puts the range at just over 186 miles. The missile was again tested in April 2019 and April 2020 . The missile weighs a total of 1,477 pounds, including a payload of 320 pounds of explosive .

“[Neptune] is intended to defeat warships such as cruiser, destroyer frigate, corvette, airborne, tank landing ships and vehicles, which operate both independently and as part of the ship groups and amphibious groups,” reads a Luch Design Bureau brochure for the missile from 2020. The Neptune is also, the brochure notes, designed to work in all kinds of weather, at night or day, and it works despite any enemy countermeasures, like jamming or shooting at the weapons

By initial accounts, the nine-year process from design start to the sinking of the Moskva appears to have been a major success. The missile had the range and punch needed for a pair of them to destroy a large, hostile ship, and the missiles do not appear to have been stopped by any defensive precautions . 

Defeat the Neptune

Guided missiles like the Neptune have real constraints. There is only so far out to sea they can hit, and there are ship-board countermeasure systems like jamming the electronics of the missile, or hitting it with an anti-missile missile, that could thwart it. Newever developments, like directed energy or laser weapons, may someday defeat missiles. 

The other way to avoid getting hit with a missile is to operate beyond its maximum range. This appears to be the approach adopted by the Russian Navy. One immediate effect of the sinking of the Moskva was that Russia’s Black Sea fleet moved further away from the Ukrainian-controlled coast , out of range of the Neptune missiles. Another is that Russia is using its ships with cruise missiles to attack targets further inland .

In naval warfare circles, missiles like the Neptune are seen as part of an “Anti-access/area denial” strategy, which is one of the more straightforward pieces of military jargon. In essence, it means that the existence of such missiles makes approaching within their range dangerous. If a navy wants to cross a contested passage, its ships will have to rely on their own defenses and will likely want to try and destroy the anti-ship missiles first. Because the Neptune missiles are launched from the back of a dedicated truck, the missiles can fire and the truck can be gone before any return attack hits.

Missiles make it harder to move with impunity, and for a ship to destroy anti-ship missile launchers it will need its own missiles. It will also likely need the support of scouting aircraft to direct the fire and possibly to hit missiles on the ground. (This, too, means flying aircraft into anti-air missile range.) 

As planners and observers watch what is happening in the Black Sea, what plays out there could have implications for how countries either contemplating or threatened by future naval assault develop weapons for the future. Nations like Taiwan were already investing heavily in anti-ship missiles , for example. After the sinking of the Moskva, it’s likely more navies will change how they operate when worried about encountering missile-armed foes.

Kelsey D. Atherton

Kelsey D. Atherton is a military technology journalist who has contributed to Popular Science since 2013. He covers uncrewed robotics and other drones, communications systems, the nuclear enterprise, and the technologies that go into planning, waging, and mitigating war.

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The Neptune: The missiles that struck Russia's flagship, the Moskva

When the flagship of Russia's Black Sea fleet, the Moskva, was badly damaged earlier this week, Ukraine immediately claimed that it had struck it with two missiles, and Russia denied it, instead blaming the damage on a fire where ammunition on the ship was stored. While the Moskva was being towed to port, it sank, after it became unstable in stormy conditions because of the damage to the hull, the Russian Defense Ministry told the Russian state news service Tass.

On Friday, a senior U.S. defense official confirmed that the Russian cruiser had been struck by two Neptune anti-ship missiles fired by the Ukrainians from land-based launchers. The Ukrainian-made Neptunes may also be launched from ship or air.

The U.S. military's worldwide equipment guide describes the Neptune as an anti-ship cruise missile with a maximum firing range of 280 kilometers, or about 174 miles. The Russian ship, about 600 feet long, was about 60 kilometers or about 37 miles south of Odesa, which is well within the range of the Neptune, a separate defense official said.

According to the second official, the ship generally has almost 500 sailors onboard. Pentagon press secretary John Kirby told CNN Thursday that some crew members were evacuated. "I don't know how many they got off. We did see indications that there were life boats and that some sailors got off the ship," he said. It's not known how many casualties there were.

The Neptune has been in service in the Ukrainian Navy since March 2021, according to the U.S. Army.

Military-today.com, a site that tracks military equipment, describes the Neptune as the Ukrainian version of a Russian Kh-35 anti-ship cruise missile, differing in that it is longer and has more fuel and a larger booster. The site says that it was developed by Luch Design Bureau, a Ukrainian defense contractor. Luch Design Bureau's description of the Neptune says, "It is intended to defeat warships such as cruiser, destroyer frigate, corvette, airborne, tank landing ships and vehicles."

Russia threatens to increase military presence near Baltic Sea if Finland and Sweden join NATO

Russia intensifies assault on Ukraine as Zelenskyy calls for more help from the West

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Investigation Update on the Viking Neptune

Cruise Line : Viking Cruises

Cruise Ship : Viking Neptune

Voyage Dates : June 6–June 20, 2023

Voyage number: 10005092

Number of passengers who reported being ill during the voyage out of total number of passengers onboard : 110 of 838 (13.1%)

Number of crew who reported being ill during the voyage out of total number of crew onboard : 9 of 455 (1.98%)

Predominant symptoms : abdominal cramps, vomiting and diarrhea

Causative agents : norovirus

Actions : In response to the outbreak, Viking Cruises and the crew aboard the ship reported the following actions:

  • Increased cleaning and disinfection procedures according to the ship’s outbreak prevention and response plan.
  • Collecting stool specimens from gastrointestinal illness cases to send to the CDC lab for pathogenic identification.
  • Providing twice daily updates on the number of gastrointestinal illness cases to VSP.

VSP environmental health officers boarded the ship at port in New York to conduct an environmental health assessment.

Note : The gastrointestinal illness cases reported are totals for the entire voyage and do not represent the number of active (symptomatic) gastrointestinal cases at any given port of call or at disembarkation.

Learn how passengers can protect themselves with these  tips for healthy cruising .

  • Inspection Reports
  • About Inspections
  • Cruise Ship Outbreak Updates
  • About Noroviruses on Cruise Ships
  • VSP Operations Manual   [PDF – 5 MB]
  • VSP Construction Guidelines   [PDF – 4 MB]
  • Illness Prevention Information
  • Publications

Exit Notification / Disclaimer Policy

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cannot attest to the accuracy of a non-federal website.
  • Linking to a non-federal website does not constitute an endorsement by CDC or any of its employees of the sponsors or the information and products presented on the website.
  • You will be subject to the destination website's privacy policy when you follow the link.
  • CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on other federal or private website.
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  • Viking Ocean

Your Thoughts DV1 Rear Facing Cabin (5110) Star?

need2cruisesoon

By need2cruisesoon , February 15, 2020 in Viking Ocean

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Cool Cruiser

need2cruisesoon

Just booked for 3/21 in the Med. 

Got cabin 5110 in rear of ship which is sandwiched by another DV1 and Explorer Suite.

Seems like a quiet place to hang, anyone can give their thoughts and opinions would be appreciated and/or photos.

Need2Cruise

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I have been in 4110 and 5089.  Both were very quiet.

cruzzzinma

Loved 5110.

retiredman

We had 5111 on the Sky this past summer. You will be under the Infinity Pool so you can count on shade. But nice quiet cabin, love the perspective the aft facing cabins provide.

Like

We were in 5111 last year.  The room itself is the same as all DV staterooms.  We loved the view off the aft facing veranda and would select that room again.  It was so quiet back there that we never saw anyone coming or going from the rooms around us over our 15 day cruise.  The supply room for the room stewards is directly across the hall, but do not let that worry you.  You will never hear any noise from them.  We actually like seeing several of the stewards there in the morning getting ready to start their day.  It gave us the opportunity to talk with several of them and they were all a joy.  Enjoy your cruise!

3,000+ Club

Interesting - because we just booked this cabin for a Caribbean cruise next spring.  We have been booking PV1s but we were looking for something cheaper and close to home for that spring cruise.  I’d been looking at other lines (shhh don’t tell) because Viking usually leaves the Caribbean by the end of March. We did the West Indies Explorer a couple of years ago at the end of March and we had some stress about a late season blizzard back home.  My husband said he was never cruising in snow season again 😝

I wasn’t finding anything interesting, so I expanded my search to March thinking maybe I’ll find something at the very end into April.  I found an Iconic Southern on Viking Sky. I mentioned it, but the price for our customary PV was more than we wanted to spend.

The very next morning I get an email from Viking with a special offer for guests booked on another cruise.  (They really are psychic!) I looked again at the price.  The PV was still too high, but the DV was doable.  I mentioned it again.  My husband said, “On Viking?”  My answer was, “Yes, but it’s March 9, and you didn’t want to cruise in March.”

He said, “but it’s Viking!”  I said, “yes, but we have to do have to do a DV with no couch, no liquor in the mini bar, and the closet by the bed.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”    

I said, “It’s ports we’ve done before.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”  

LOL I found 5110 was available and we love the aft or aft wraps, and that was the clincher for me.  My husband simply said, “but it’s Viking!”

We booked it!  Hoping it’s a good room. We do like deck 5!

“But it’s Viking!”  Love it!  

( Bet Viking does too!)    😁

7 hours ago, Cyber Kat said: Interesting - because we just booked this cabin for a Caribbean cruise next spring.  We have been booking PV1s but we were looking for something cheaper and close to home for that spring cruise.  I’d been looking at other lines (shhh don’t tell) because Viking usually leaves the Caribbean by the end of March. We did the West Indies Explorer a couple of years ago at the end of March and we had some stress about a late season blizzard back home.  My husband said he was never cruising in snow season again 😝   I wasn’t finding anything interesting, so I expanded my search to March thinking maybe I’ll find something at the very end into April.  I found an Iconic Southern on Viking Sky. I mentioned it, but the price for our customary PV was more than we wanted to spend.   The very next morning I get an email from Viking with a special offer for guests booked on another cruise.  (They really are psychic!) I looked again at the price.  The PV was still too high, but the DV was doable.  I mentioned it again.  My husband said, “On Viking?”  My answer was, “Yes, but it’s March 9, and you didn’t want to cruise in March.”   He said, “but it’s Viking!”  I said, “yes, but we have to do have to do a DV with no couch, no liquor in the mini bar, and the closet by the bed.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”     I said, “It’s ports we’ve done before.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”   LOL I found 5110 was available and we love the aft or aft wraps, and that was the clincher for me.  My husband simply said, “but it’s Viking!” We booked it!  Hoping it’s a good room. We do like deck 5!

I understand what you mean about the weather in East Jibib! It can be really terrible that time of year! Have a great time!

Haha

CCWineLover

On 2/15/2020 at 6:22 AM, Cyber Kat said: Interesting - because we just booked this cabin for a Caribbean cruise next spring.  We have been booking PV1s but we were looking for something cheaper and close to home for that spring cruise.  I’d been looking at other lines (shhh don’t tell) because Viking usually leaves the Caribbean by the end of March. We did the West Indies Explorer a couple of years ago at the end of March and we had some stress about a late season blizzard back home.  My husband said he was never cruising in snow season again 😝   I wasn’t finding anything interesting, so I expanded my search to March thinking maybe I’ll find something at the very end into April.  I found an Iconic Southern on Viking Sky. I mentioned it, but the price for our customary PV was more than we wanted to spend.   The very next morning I get an email from Viking with a special offer for guests booked on another cruise.  (They really are psychic!) I looked again at the price.  The PV was still too high, but the DV was doable.  I mentioned it again.  My husband said, “On Viking?”  My answer was, “Yes, but it’s March 9, and you didn’t want to cruise in March.”   He said, “but it’s Viking!”  I said, “yes, but we have to do have to do a DV with no couch, no liquor in the mini bar, and the closet by the bed.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”     I said, “It’s ports we’ve done before.”  He said, “but it’s Viking!”   LOL I found 5110 was available and we love the aft or aft wraps, and that was the clincher for me.  My husband simply said, “but it’s Viking!” We booked it!  Hoping it’s a good room. We do like deck 5!

Love the commentary!  Great story and thanks for sharing.

We also have done the Caribbean on Viking Sea and have pondered doing another Caribbean cruise where the focus would be to just relax and not be worried about seeing all the ports.

You mentioned special email offers from Viking for being already booked on another cruise.  Interesting.  We've had cruises on Viking booked into the future, and have NEVER had any email offers of any kind from Viking.  Wondering if they total up all the cruises or revenue you have had with Viking and you have to hit some sort of bar to qualify for special offers.

4 hours ago, CCWineLover said:   Love the commentary!  Great story and thanks for sharing. We also have done the Caribbean on Viking Sea and have pondered doing another Caribbean cruise where the focus would be to just relax and not be worried about seeing all the ports. You mentioned special email offers from Viking for being already booked on another cruise.  Interesting.  We've had cruises on Viking booked into the future, and have NEVER had any email offers of any kind from Viking.  Wondering if they total up all the cruises or revenue you have had with Viking and you have to hit some sort of bar to qualify for special offers.

I have gotten both email offers and mail offers.  I just got a mail one for 2021-2022 cruises, that expires at the end of this month.  This over came with a catalog for both ocean and river cruises, and it would be very easy to overlook the slip of paper it was on.  

The last Reservation I made (from an email offer with code), the Viking agent mentioned a cabin upgrade and OBC, not included in any  email or mailing.  So we were able to pile offers.  Stumbling onto this was strictly lucky on my part.  

Right now, I have reservations booked for 2 ocean, one river cruise up through 2021.  

11 minutes ago, Mich3554 said:   Right now, I have reservations booked for 2 ocean, one river cruise up through 2021.  

Yes, the river cruise we will do just not sure when.

11 hours ago, CCWineLover said:   Love the commentary!  Great story and thanks for sharing. We also have done the Caribbean on Viking Sea and have pondered doing another Caribbean cruise where the focus would be to just relax and not be worried about seeing all the ports. You mentioned special email offers from Viking for being already booked on another cruise.  Interesting.  We've had cruises on Viking booked into the future, and have NEVER had any email offers of any kind from Viking.  Wondering if they total up all the cruises or revenue you have had with Viking and you have to hit some sort of bar to qualify for special offers.

We had both a river cruise and an ocean cruise booked when we got the offer.  It was the first we’ve gotten with good incentives!

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Explained: The Neptune cruise missile that severely damaged a Russian warship

Open workshop on CSAT 2024 by ForumIAS | 31 Jan, 1, 2, and 3 Feb. 2024 at 8:30 AM Click Here for more information

What is the News?

Ukraine has claimed that it has damaged the Russian Black Sea Fleet Flagship ‘Moskva’ by Neptune Anti-Ship Cruise Missiles.

What is the Neptune Missile?

Neptune is a coastal anti-ship cruise missile that is capable of the destruction of naval vessels in a range of 300 km. 

The missile system was inducted into the Ukrainian Defence Forces in 2021 after being in development for six years.

The design of this missile is based on a Russian Kh-35 cruise missile, which goes by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) name of AS-20 Kayak.

What is Moska?

Moskva is a guided missile cruiser of the Russian Navy named after the city of Moscow. 

The Moskva was originally commissioned as the Slava in 1983. It was recommissioned in 2000 as the Moskva with refurbished weapon systems and electronics.

It is the flagship of the Black Sea Fleet of the Russian Navy and carries a crew of around 500 personnel.

Source:   This post is based on the article “Explained: The Neptune cruise missile that severely damaged a Russian warship” published in Indian Express on 16th April 2022.

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The 9 Worst Cruise Ship Disasters

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See recent posts by Neil Gladstone

The Titanic may be the most famous ship disaster, but surprisingly, it’s not even close to being the deadliest wreck that ever occurred on a luxury liner. If you’re trying to dissuade someone from taking a cruise, you should show them this list of maritime misadventures presented in no particular order. Disclaimer: The vast majority of cruises sail without incident and are safe and not filled with poop. (Oh yeah, we’ll get there.) Get your plate ready for a buffet of high-seas horror.

1. RMS Titanic

F.G.O. Stuart (1843-1923) {{PD-old}} /Wikimedia Commons

The many experts in 1912 who considered the Titanic “unsinkable” were to be proven wrong on the boat’s maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City. Thomas Andrews had designed the ship to withstand head-on collisions and rammings from other ships. However, the North Atlantic Ocean iceberg that took down the vessel scraped through five of its 16 watertight compartments. The boat would have reportedly remained afloat if it had only gone through four. Like other systems at the time, the Titanic’s lifeboats were designed to shepherd passengers to nearby rescue ships, not take them to shore. Unfortunately, help was many hours away in the wee hours of April 15 when the boat was going under. The poor crew organization also caused many lifeboats to leave the ship at far less than full capacity. Plus, they only had enough boats for about a third of the onboard. As a result, more than 1,500 people died — either on the ship or in the icy waters, waiting for help. A recent theory suggests a fire that started in the hull before the ship set sail weakened the vessel’s steel walls, making it susceptible to an iceberg that normally wouldn’t have caused as much damage.

2. Eastern Star’s Dongfang zhi Xing

In 2015, Dongfang zhi Xing was traveling on the Yangtze River in China when a thunderstorm struck, and the boat capsized. Ships in the area were warned that bad storms were coming and told to take precautions, but it is unclear if the Dongfang zhi Xing ever received the warnings and continued to sail. The ship was met with winds of up to 72-85 mph, and ultimately, a downburst (a strong downward wind) caused the ship to capsize and sink. Out of the 454 people on board, only 12 survived, making the total number of dead 442.

3. Carnival Cruise Line’s Triumph

DVIDSHUB/Flickr

A generator fire on Carnival Cruise Lines’s Triumph (now called Carnival Sunrise) left the ship powerless, and a late-night comedy punchline was born: “The Poop Cruise.” Without working bathrooms, passengers were forced to drop their payloads into red “hazardous waste” bags and stuff them into garbage cans left in the hall. Passengers described carpets soaked with more than two inches of raw sewage. News reports described the scene as a “shanty town” and a “new circle of hell.” One passenger reportedly called her husband and told him that their 12-year-old daughter had Skittles for breakfast. It took four days for the Triumph to be towed from the Gulf of Mexico to Mobile, Alabama, where it was possible to smell the ship from the dock. Later, 31 passengers claimed long-lasting damage, including PTSD, and sued. After the verdict, 27 of them split $118,000, many earning less than $3,000 (minus legal fees) for their troubles.

4. Costa Concordia

European Commission DG ECHO/Flickr

One of the biggest passenger ships ever wrecked, the Costa Concordia had 17 decks, six restaurants, a three-story theater, and enough room for 4,200 vacationers. On January 13, 2012, Captain Francesco Schettino agreed to a request by the ship’s chief maître d’, Antonello Tievoli, and sailed closer to Isola del Giglio than normal. Why? Tievoli, a native of Giglio, wanted to impress and “salute” local residents. Unfortunately, Captain Schettino turned off the ship’s alarm for the computer navigation system and later admitted he thought he knew the waters well enough to navigate by sight. However, the ship’s first mate testified that the captain had left his glasses in his cabin and requested them. The Costa Concordia struck an underwater rock, capsized, and sank, killing 32 passengers. Schettino’s worst maritime sin? He abandoned the ship with 300 passengers still onboard. A Coast Guard officer in contact with the ship at the time of the sinking claimed he told Schettino to get back onboard. After being convicted of manslaughter and pursuing several appeals, Schettino only started his 16-year prison sentence in May of 2017. The salvage effort (the ship was completely dismantled) was the largest effort of its kind.

5. SS Eastland

Launched in 1903, the SS Eastland was a passenger ship based in Chicago and used for tours. Although the ship had noted listing (tilting) since its inception and some measures had been taken to rectify this, the SS Eastland was still suffering from being top-heavy when boarding for a cruise in 1915. The ship was meant to sail from Chicago to Michigan City, Indiana, carrying workers from Western Electric Company’s Hawthorne Works for a picnic. On July 24, 2,572 passengers boarded, with many congregating on the open upper decks. While still docked, the ship began to list to the port side, and reportedly, at some point, more passengers rushed to the port side, causing the ship to roll onto its side completely. Despite the river’s bottom being just 20 feet below and the shore being about the same distance, a total of 844 passengers and crew members died, including 22 entire families.

6. Royal Pacific

When the Royal Pacific was first launched as a passenger ferry in 1964, it could carry 250 passengers, 91 cars, and 16 trucks. Sold and converted into a cruise ship in the late 1980s, the boat’s maiden voyage was a two-night “cruise to nowhere” from Singapore and sailed by Phuket, Malacca, and Penang before returning home. At around 2 a.m., when most passengers were asleep, the crew heard a loud bang, and the plates on the buffet table crashed to the ground. A Taiwanese trawler, Terfu 51, had accidentally rammed the ship, leaving a six-foot gash in the side. As the trawler pulled away, there was a deafening sound of metal scraping against metal. The PA system wasn’t working properly on the boat, but the safety officer ran downstairs to survey the damage. When he returned, he told everyone to put on their life jackets. Reports vary about how many passengers were impacted — most tallies number 30 dead and 70 injured. Several passengers also complained that a mix of Greek-, English- and Mandarin-speaking crew members led to few people understanding what anyone was saying.

7. SS Morro Castle

The story of the SS Morro Castle is so dreadful it’s surprising no Hollywood producer has turned the tale into a horror movie. Director Fritz Lang collaborated on a script about the tragedy, and named it “Hell Afloat” (which is a pretty apt description), but it was never made. Between 1930 and 1934, the SS Morro Castle regularly shuttled 480-plus passengers between Havana and New York. While onboard, there was no Depression to worry about and no Prohibition, which meant plenty of booze-filled partying. However, the September 1934 return sail from Cuba to the Big Apple seemed cursed. On September 7, Captain Robert Wilmott complained of stomach trouble after eating dinner and retired to his cabin, where he later died of an apparent heart attack. Chief Officer William Warms took command, and a few hours later, around 3 a.m. on September 8, a fire started in one of the storage lockers. The crew’s attempts to fight the fire were haphazard and inadequate, and soon, the blaze couldn’t be contained. Many crew members abandoned the ship, leaving confused passengers to fend for themselves in the dark, smoky hallways. Some jumped from the deck to their death in the water. Rescuers lined up on the Jersey Shore to meet the lifeboats carrying passengers. The next morning, the burning, black hull of the SS Morro Castle ran aground at Asbury Park, New Jersey. Of the 549 people aboard the cruise, 86 guests and 49 crew members died.

8. Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas

A cruise can be an oasis of calm in rough waters, but it’s also a petri dish of disease where viruses ricochet from passenger to passenger. In 2014, the Royal Caribbean’s Explorer of the Seas cruise from New Jersey to the Caribbean earned the dubious honor of being the ship with more sick passengers than any other boat trip since the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention started keeping statistics more than 20 years ago. An estimated 700 passengers and crew members were sick at some point. Most cruise ship illnesses result from norovirus, that causes inflammation of the stomach and large intestines and regular trips to the “head.” If you’re wondering how to stay healthy on a cruise with sick passengers, plenty of handwashing (and avoiding ill people) is key. Bugs pass quickly through contact with ship railings, bathroom doors, and buffet food.

9. MTS Oceanos

Built by a French company and first launched in 1952, the MTS Oceanos was purchased by a Greek company in 1976. On August 3, 1991, Oceanos set sail for East London, South Africa, and headed north for Durban, led by Captain Yiannis Avranas. The ship reportedly headed into 40-knot winds and 30-foot swells, and thus, the typical sail-away outdoor deck party with British entertainers Moss and Tracy Hills was moved to an indoor lounge. The sea conditions worsened that night, leading to the ship rolling from side to side, and eventually, an explosion was heard due to a lack of repairs for the waste disposal system. This all led to the ship losing power and water filling its generator room, so the generators were shut down and the ship was led adrift. A distress call was sent and answered by numerous South African helicopters and a Dutch container ship. Shockingly, the captain and many crew members were among the first to be airlifted to shore, leaving the entertainment staff to coordinate the rescue efforts and help passengers to safety. All 571 passengers and crew members were saved by the time the ship sank nose-first into the sea.

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COMMENTS

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  4. The Poseidon Adventure (1972 film)

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  6. R-360 Neptune

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  7. The Neptune: The missiles that struck Russia's flagship, the Moskva

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  9. HMS Neptune (20)

    Neptune was the fourth ship of its class and was the ninth Royal Navy vessel to carry the name. Construction and commissioning [ edit ] Built by Portsmouth Dockyard , Neptune was laid down on 24 September 1931, launched on 31 January 1933, and commissioned into the Royal Navy on 12 February 1934 with the pennant number 20.

  10. A Look at Ukraine's Neptune Antiship Cruise Missile

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    Updated: Apr 15, 2022, 02:05 PM IST Edited by In another big blow to Russia, after the detention of Viktor Medvedchuk, longtime confidant to President Vladimir Putin, Russia's largest warship has been destroyed in the Black Sea. The Russian Defence Ministry has confirmed the destruction of the warship.

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    The wartime sinking of the German Wilhelm Gustloff in January 1945 in World War II by a Soviet Navy submarine, with an estimated loss of about 9,400 people, remains the deadliest isolated maritime disaster ever, excluding such events as the destruction of entire fleets like the 1274 and 1281 storms that are said to have devastated Kublai Khan 's...

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  21. Explained: The Neptune cruise missile that severely damaged a Russian

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  23. The 9 Worst Cruise Ship Disasters

    The 9 Worst Cruise Ship Disasters. Neil Gladstone December 20, 2023. The Titanic may be the most famous ship disaster, but surprisingly, it's not even close to being the deadliest wreck that ever occurred on a luxury liner. If you're trying to dissuade someone from taking a cruise, you should show them this list of maritime misadventures ...